Thank-You Thursday / 23 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Got something you’re thankful for?  Today’s the day to share it!  Try one of the following:

  • Say a prayer of thanksgiving at your Home Shrine.
  • Write a thank-you note to one of your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Leave a thank-you gift at your Home Shrine.  It doesn’t need to be diamonds and Godiva Chocolate—a Jolly Rancher or a found coin might be enough!
  • Take a moment to thank someone close to you for something they did to help you.
  • Or thank them just for being there!
  • Pay your thanks forward—donate to a charity or do a random act of kindness.
  • For those inclined towards Hellenic polytheism: Pandora’s Kharis, a charity fund established by Elani Temperance of Baring the Aegis, is currently raising money to help the Maetreum of Cybele, a religious organization and convent located in New York.  The deadline for donations is September 26, so get your donations in while you can!
  • Want Your Mod to include other fundraisers organized by pagans, polytheists, or other practitioners?  Send an ask or fanmail!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 23rd of the month of Boedromión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 23rd of the lunar month is sacred to Athene.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 31 and 32 to Athene and Nike.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the ogdóe phthínontos (roughly pronounced “heb-DOH-may f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the eighth [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Cleanse-Day Wednesday / 22 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Shrine getting a little dusty?  Time to bust out the barley/natron/vinegar/Windex/elbow grease!  Don’t obsess—just do one of the following:

  • Detail-dust the smaller ornaments on your shrine.
  • Detail-dust the larger ornaments on your shrine.
  • Wash and dry your altar-cloths.
  • Take a damp rag (or other appropriate cleansing item) and give your icons/eidola/images a mini-bath.
  • Wipe, dust, or otherwise clean your altar base (or the piece of furniture where your altar is located).
  • Sweep, mop, or vacuum the floor around your altar space.
  • Offer some incense, sprinkle some khernips, smoke-cleanse, or otherwise purify your altar-space ritually.
  • Altar’s spotless?  Tackle a mess in another room of your living space.  Cleanliness is next to godliness!
  • Stressed out?  Emotional and psychological cleansing is important, too.  Do something to purify or detox yourself!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 22nd of the month of Boedromión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Hellenismo suggests that the 22nd is sacred to Athene, though You Mod has not found any sources to corroborate this.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 30 to the Kouretes and 38 to Korybas (a member of the Korybantes).
  • The Kouretes and Korybantes were both groups (usually trios, groups of five, or groups of nine) of Theoi or Daimones depicted as warlike men, and They were given charge of sacred mysteries.  The Kouretes were also supposedly given the job of protecting baby Zeus from his father Kronos, and did a loud war-dance as part of Their job of being a divine distraction.  The Kouretes were originally from Crete, and the Korybantes from Samothrake, though the two groups were heavily associated with one another and confused with one another even in ancient Hellas.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the enáte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “enn-AH-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the ninth [until] the ending [of the month].” 
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Tasty Tuesday / 21 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Time for some noms!  Try something along these lines:

  • Offer some food your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities would like on your Home Shrine.
  • Offer some food YOU like on your Home Shrine.
  • Same as the above, but with drinks.
  • Make something to eat and dedicate the time/effort to your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Make something to eat and give it away to loved ones, or to people who need the food.
  • Donate to a local Food Bank.
  • Practice some Kitchen Witchery.
  • Submit a recipe to Ritual Recipes!  (Or find something there that you’d like to make!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 21st of the month of Boedromión.
  • It is also the seventh (and final) day of the Eleusínia tà Mégala, or Greater Eleusinian Mysteries.  These mysteries are lost to us now, but for as long as this festival goes on, it is a good time to honor Demeter as overseer of food crops; Persephone as the overseer of the death and rebirth of all life (plant included); Hermes and Hekate as the mediators between the world of death and the world of life; and other related Theoi.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Hesiod’s Works and Days and the Scholia accompanying those verses suggests that the 21st is sacred to Athene, though Your Mod has been unable to find any information as to why.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 47, 48, and 49 to Sabazios, Ippa, and Lysios Lenaios.
  • For those of you unfamiliar with these Theoi, they are all associated with syncretic mysteries surrounding Dionysos.  Here’s more information about each one:
  • Sabazios is a Thracian/Phrygian god syncretized with a few different Hellenic Theoi—including Zeus, Ares, and Dionysos.  If you’d like to read more about Thracian religion and mysticism, Your Mod recommends the blog Anomalous Thracian.  Its author is a spirit-worker who follows multiple paths, one of them being Thracian initiatory traditions.
  • Ippa is a Phrygian goddess, alternately interpreted as a nurse of Dionysos or a form of the Phrygian mother-goddess Kybele, who—in some accounts—is supposed to have rescued Dionysos from Hera’s wrath by taking the infant vine-god to Kybele Herself.
  • Lysios Lenaios is an epithet of Dionysos as a wine-god who helped humans to relax and have fun (among other things).  There’s some dispute about the epithet “Lenaios,” as it has etymological ties to Greek terms for both the wine-press and the Mainades (female followers of Dionysos).  The epithet “Lysios” comes from the Greek word lyein, meaning “to loosen.”
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the dekáte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “deck-AH-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the tenth [until] the ending [of the month].”  We start at ten instead of one so we can count down to the new moon.
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions? Send us an ask or fanmail!

Music Monday / 20 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take five and play some music at your home shrine.  Try doing one (or more than one, or all) of the following:

  • Put a favorite song on the radio and play it at your Home Shrine.  Don’t forget to invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to accept the offering (or even join in)!
  • Dance to the music.
  • Sing something.
  • Play a musical instrument?  Play a song or solo!
  • Dedicate some music practice to one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.

Spread the devotion (and, more importantly, the good music) by reblogging this post with your song of choice!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 20th of the month of Boedromión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • It is also the sixth day of the Eleusínia tà Mégala, or Greater Eleusinian Mysteries.  These mysteries are lost to us now, but for as long as this festival goes on, it is a good time to honor Demeter as overseer of food crops; Persephone as the overseer of the death and rebirth of all life (plant included); Hermes and Hekate as the mediators between the world of death and the world of life; and other related Theoi.
  • Hesiod’s Works and Days and the Scholia accompanying those verses suggests that the 20th is sacred to Apollon, though Your Mod has been unable to find any information as to why.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 33 and 75 to Apollon and the Mousai, in accordance with Hesiod.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the months is called the eikás or eikosté (roughly pronounced “ey-KAHSS” or “ey-koss-TAY”), meaning “the twentieth.”  (That’s surprisingly straightforward for the Hellenic calendar.)
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

HHH Weekly Roundup: September 14-20 2014


This Week’s Hellenic Calendar Reminders:

  • The Eleusínia tà Mégala, or Greater Eleusinian Mysteries, continue until dusk on Tuesday this week.  While the mysteries are lost to us, in the Northern Hemisphere, it is appropriate to honor Demeter, Persephone, and a few other related Gods and Daimones (such as Triptolemos, Hermes, and Hekate) for their roles in bringing all that dies back to life.  It is also appropriate to honor Demeter and Persephone as overseers of the harvest, if harvesting takes place where you live right now.  (For our readers in the Southern Hemisphere, your Eleusínia may start in March instead—if you wish to celebrate it, Your Mod recommends you do some divination concerning the date.)

Festivals in Other Traditions:

  • Christianity: Several traditional sects of Christianity venerate the cross (or the finding of the cross) upon which Jesus was crucified today, 14 September 2014.
  • Roman Catholicism: Saints’ festivals this week, beginning today, 1 June, are: Sunday—Exaltation of the Holy Cross; Monday—Our Lady of Sorrows; Tuesday—St. Cornelius; Wednesday—St. Robert Bellarmine; Thursday—St. Joseph of Cupertino; Friday—St. Januarius; Saturday—Sts. Andrew Kim Taegon, Paul Chong Hasang and Companions.
  • Eastern Orthodox Christianity: Here are the commemmorations for SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday; and Saturday.
  • Kemeticism: Opet festivals will be starting up in the next couple of weeks.  This festival celebrates the Theban triad of Amun, Mut, and Khonsu, and reaffirms the marriage of Amun and Mut.  Originally, there was also a celebration of the Pharaoh’s coronation, but most Kemetics use today to reaffirm their own relationship with Netjer, family, and community, often by holding celebrations and donating to charity.
  • Shinto: The Tsurugaoka Hachiman shrine, near Tokyo, holds its traditional festival starting today (14 September) through Tuesday (16 September).  This festival features tea offerings to the Kami, traditional dance, festival food, and demonstrations of horseback archery.
  • Ekklesia Antinoou: Friday, 19 September, celebrates Eunostos and Antinous; it is also the birthday celebration of Divus Antoninus Pius.

Blog Highlight:

  • We heartily recommend you check out Polytheist.com!  Recently launched, this collection of columns shares wisdom from a variety of polytheist bloggers, from an expert on Platonic philosophy to a mother of three to a street artist.

Article Highlights:

See anything this past week in the pagan or polytheist spheres of Tumblr that made you cheer?  Any posts that made you proud to be on the path you follow?  Any people or bloggers that you feel others should read?  Or do you know of a festival or event coming up that you would like to share?  Send them in!

This weekly round-up post may end up catering primarily to Hellenic Polytheists, but any pagan faith can submit recommendations if they want to.  Posts, events, and other items will be posted at Your Mod’s discretion.

Self-Care Sunday / 19 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Even the most devoted of devotees gets burned out once in a while.  Take a day to rest, relax, and recharge!

  • Do something for yourself.  Even if it means adding five minutes to your short shower, do something to remind yourself that you matter!  Even if your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities are distant or aloof, you always matter to your Home.  YOU ARE IMPORTANT.  Never forget that.
  • Meditate.  Or try to!
  • Do some work around your living space.
  • Spend time with family, friends, or other loved ones.
  • Do something important that matters to YOU, even (especially?) if it’s not related to your religious or spiritual life.
  • Find a book, article, or something else about your religion/spirituality.  Read it (or at least part of it).  Take notes.  Maybe you can post your notes to a blog for others to see!
  • Or do the same with a book about something YOU like that’s not related to your religion or spirituality!

Remember, Devotees: the point we’re making is that you CAN take five minutes out of your day and do something to remind yourself and your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities that you’re thinking of Them!  Take five minutes and remind yourself of your Home.

Don’t obsess!  Just be at home.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 19th of the month of Boedromión.
  • It is also the fifth day of the Eleusínia tà Mégala, or Greater Eleusinian Mysteries.  These mysteries are lost to us now, but for as long as this festival goes on, it is a good time to honor Demeter as overseer of food crops; Persephone as the overseer of the death and rebirth of all life (plant included); Hermes and Hekate as the mediators between the world of death and the world of life; and other related Theoi.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 19th is not otherwise traditionally associated with any Theos in the Athenian calendar, though the scattered ancient commentary (collectively called Scholia) on Hesiod’s Works and Days suggests that the 18th and 19th of the month are good for purifying and warding oneself and one’s space.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 1164, and 37 to Herakles, Ares, and the Kouretes.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the enáte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “enn-AH-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the ninth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Setup Saturday / 18 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take a good look at your Home Shrine.  Is it everything you want it to be?  If not, try one of the following:

  • Remove an object that you think no longer belongs on your Home Shrine.  Is it still important to you, or have your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities asked you to keep it?  Put it somewhere else in your living space—so long as it feels like it belongs there!
  • Have something you’ve been meaning to cleanse/purify and add to your altar space?  Today’s the day!
  • Dreaming of the perfect altar?  Put together a Home Shrine Wishlist.  You don’t need to go out and buy everything—but it’s helpful to get an idea of what you want on your altar eventually!
  • Got your Wishlist put together?  Got money?  Go get one of the items on your Wishlist!
  • Something about your Home Shrine setup bugging you, but you can’t put your finger on it?  Try rearranging things and see if you like it better.  (You can always go change it back!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 18th of the month of Boedromión.
  • It is also the fourth day of the Eleusínia tà Mégala, or Greater Eleusinian Mysteries.  These mysteries are lost to us now, but for as long as this festival goes on, it is a good time to honor Demeter as overseer of food crops; Persephone as the overseer of the death and rebirth of all life (plant included); Hermes and Hekate as the mediators between the world of death and the world of life; and other related Theoi.
  • Hellenion is celebrating a libation to Demeter and Persephone today, so feel free to join in!
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 18th is not traditionally associated with any Theos in the Athenian calendar, though the scattered ancient commentary (collectively called Scholia) on Hesiod’s Works and Days suggests that the 18th and 19th of the month are good for purifying oneself and one’s space.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 1518, and 65 to Hera, Zeus, and Hephaistos.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the ogdóe mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “ogg-DOE-ay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the eighth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Fun and Fancy Friday / 17 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Today is a day to do something crazy, creative, or otherwise just plain old fun a your Home Shrine!

  • Today’s Challenge: Write a song or a poem and perform it at your Home Shrine.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 17th of the month of Boedromión.
  • It is also the third day of the Eleusínia tà Mégala, or Greater Eleusinian Mysteries.  These mysteries are lost to us now, but for as long as this festival goes on, it is a good time to honor Demeter as overseer of food crops; Persephone as the overseer of the death and rebirth of all life (plant included); Hermes and Hekate as the mediators between the world of death and the world of life; and other related Theoi.
  • Today also marks the Epidauria, a quieter day in the Eleusinian Mysteries.  Today was historically a day to meditate and relax from what had happened in the Mysteries so far; it held offerings to Asklepios, the Theos of healing, medicine, and physicians, in memory of the time He arrived late to the Mysteries.  Today might be a good day to offer to Asklepios and do divination concerning your more personal rituals.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 17th is not traditionally associated with any Theos in the Athenian calendar, though Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions involve reading Orphic Hymns 44, 45, and 46 to Dionysos.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hebdóme mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “heb-DOH-may meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the seventh of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Thank-You Thursday / 16 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Got something you’re thankful for?  Today’s the day to share it!  Try one of the following:

  • Say a prayer of thanksgiving at your Home Shrine.
  • Write a thank-you note to one of your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Leave a thank-you gift at your Home Shrine.  It doesn’t need to be diamonds and Godiva Chocolate—a Jolly Rancher or a found coin might be enough!
  • Take a moment to thank someone close to you for something they did to help you.
  • Or thank them just for being there!
  • Pay your thanks forward—donate to a charity or do a random act of kindness.
  • For those inclined towards Hellenic polytheism: Pandora’s Kharis, a charity fund established by Elani Temperance of Baring the Aegis, raised $100 US for The Trevor Project, a fundraiser to provide crisis counseling and suicide prevention services for young LGBTQIA* people.  Thank you if you have donated over the past month!  Pandora’s Kharis is currently accepting new pitches for fundraising organizations, so join up with them on Facebook and get involved.
  • Want Your Mod to include other fundraisers organized by pagans, polytheists, or other practitioners?  Send an ask or fanmail!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 16th of the month of Metageitnión.
  • It is also the second day of the Eleusínia tà Mégala, or Greater Eleusinian Mysteries.  These mysteries are lost to us now, but for as long as this festival goes on, it is a good time to honor Demeter as overseer of food crops; Persephone as the overseer of the death and rebirth of all life (plant included); Hermes and Hekate as the mediators between the world of death and the world of life; and other related Theoi.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 16th of the lunar month is otherwise not traditionally associated with any particular Theoi, though Erkhia’s calendar associated it with sacrifices to Semele and Dionysos.  Drew Campbell associates it with Artemis.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 35 to Artemis, 1 to Prothyraia (a Theos associated with childbirth), 34 to Leto (the Mother of Artemis and Apollon), and 71 to Tykhe (the Theos associated with the ups and downs of fortune).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hékte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “HECK-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the sixth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Cleanse-Day Wednesday / 15 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Shrine getting a little dusty?  Time to bust out the barley/natron/vinegar/Windex/elbow grease!  Don’t obsess—just do one of the following:

  • Detail-dust the smaller ornaments on your shrine.
  • Detail-dust the larger ornaments on your shrine.
  • Wash and dry your altar-cloths.
  • Take a damp rag (or other appropriate cleansing item) and give your icons/eidola/images a mini-bath.
  • Wipe, dust, or otherwise clean your altar base (or the piece of furniture where your altar is located).
  • Sweep, mop, or vacuum the floor around your altar space.
  • Offer some incense, sprinkle some khernips, smoke-cleanse, or otherwise purify your altar-space ritually.
  • Altar’s spotless?  Tackle a mess in another room of your living space.  Cleanliness is next to godliness!
  • Stressed out?  Emotional and psychological cleansing is important, too.  Do something to purify or detox yourself!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 15th of the month of Boedromión.
  • It is also the beginning of the Eleusínia tà Mégala, or Greater Eleusinian Mysteries.  These mysteries are lost to us now, but for as long as this festival goes on, it is a good time to honor Demeter as overseer of food crops; Persephone as the overseer of the death and rebirth of all life (plant included); Hermes and Hekate as the mediators between the world of death and the world of life; and other related Theoi.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 15th of the lunar month, like the 5th and 25th, is considered a holy and even inauspicious day.  It is sacred to Athene in the Athenian calendar, and to Horkos (the personification of Oath) in Drew Campbell’s notes.
  • The 15th and 16th of Hekatombaión, in ancient Athens, marked the Synoikía, a celebration of the unification of Attica by Theseus.  (Attica is the region of ancient Hellas in which Athens was located.)  Since this celebrated that specific place, your own Synoikia may take place on your country’s Independence Day or similar.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 58 to the Moirai (Fates); 62 and 63 to Dikaionsyne (Fairness) and Nomos (Law); and 68 and 69 to the Erinyes/Eumenides (the Furies).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the pémpte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “PEMP-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the fifth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Tasty Tuesday / 14 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Time for some noms!  Try something along these lines:

  • Offer some food your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities would like on your Home Shrine.
  • Offer some food YOU like on your Home Shrine.
  • Same as the above, but with drinks.
  • Make something to eat and dedicate the time/effort to your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Make something to eat and give it away to loved ones, or to people who need the food.
  • Donate to a local Food Bank.
  • Practice some Kitchen Witchery.
  • Submit a recipe to Ritual Recipes!  (Or find something there that you’d like to make!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 14th of the month of Boedromión.
  • The 14th, or whatever day the Full Moon falls on, is sacred to Selene and other Theoi with lunar connections.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 12 and 13 to Kronos and Rhea, the Titan Father and Mother of Zeus and His siblings, as well as Hymn 36 to all the Titans in general.  (Remember, though some Titans are big meanies in the myths, They also control / are associated with natural forces that are necessary to the balance of the Earth and universe.)
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the tetárte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “tet-ARR-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the fourth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Check out this tumblr e-shrine to Selene!
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Music Monday / 13 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take five and play some music at your home shrine.  Try doing one (or more than one, or all) of the following:

  • Put a favorite song on the radio and play it at your Home Shrine.  Don’t forget to invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to accept the offering (or even join in)!
  • Dance to the music.
  • Sing something.
  • Play a musical instrument?  Play a song or solo!
  • Dedicate some music practice to one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.

Spread the devotion (and, more importantly, the good music) by reblogging this post with your song of choice!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 13th of the month of Boedromión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 13th of the lunar month is not historically associated with any Theoi in particular, though Drew Campbell associates it with Athene because of Athene’s tie to the number 3 in Hellenic myth.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 31 and 32 to Athene and Nike.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the tríte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “TREE-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the third of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

HHH Weekly Roundup: September 7-13 2014


This Week’s Hellenic Calendar Reminders:

  • Today, 7 September, marks the Athenian celebration called the Demokratía.  Your Mod mistakenly marked this down for last Sunday, but if you are interested in honoring the date, it is proper to offer to Zeus, Themis (Law and Order), and Athene.  Otherwise, you can celebrate your own Demokratia (or another politically appropriate festival name) on a day important to your government’s history.
  • Wednesday, 10 September (the first day following the full moon), marks the beginning of the Eleusínia tà Mégala, or Greater Eleusinian Mysteries.  While the mysteries are lost to us, in the Northern Hemisphere, it is appropriate to honor Demeter, Persephone, and a few other related Gods and Daimones (such as Triptolemos, Hermes, and Hekate) for their roles in bringing all that dies back to life.  It is also appropriate to honor Demeter and Persephone as overseers of the harvest, if harvesting takes place where you live right now.  (For our readers in the Southern Hemisphere, your Eleusínia may start in March instead—if you wish to celebrate it, Your Mod recommends you do some divination concerning the date.)
  • The Eleusínia tà Mégala lasts until dusk on Tuesday, 16 September.
  • Friday, 12 September, marks a festival called the Epidaúria.  Occurring in the middle of the Greater Eleusínia, it commemorated the hero (later Theos) Asklépios’ late arrival to the Mysteries, which had to be repeated in brief for Him.  During this day, the Athenians and guests participating in the Mysteries had a day to recuperate from the previous three days of festivity; it was appropriate to stay inside and meditate.  Today, it is a good day to offer to Asklépios and do divination.
  • On Saturday, 13 September, Hellenion members will perform their monthly libation—this time, to Demeter and Persephone, since we are in the middle of the Greater Eleusínia.

Festivals in Other Traditions:

  • Hinduism: Today, 7 September, marks the feast of Onam in India’s Kerala state.  This festival celebrates Vamana, the 5th avatar of Vishnu, who went to the generous king Mahabali and asked for three paces of land.  When Mahabali consented, Vamana changed his size, growing large enough to cross from heaven to earth in one step, and from earth to the underworld in a second step.  With nothing left to give, Mahabali offered his head for Vamana’s third step; in reward for his humility, Vamana gave Mahabali immortality.  It is thought that Mahabali’s spirit visits Kerala, his old kingdom; he and Vamana are honored with temporary “carpets” made of flower petals, and feasts served on plantain leaves. // On Tuesday, 9 September, a 16-day period begins during which Hindu families honor and offer to their three preceding generations of ancestors.  It is thought that the three most recent generations, when they die, to go the realm of Yama, the world of the dead, from which they still have the power to help their descendants; but when a new generation dies, the oldest one in Yama’s realm leaves to unite with God in heaven.
  • Roman Catholicism: Saints’ festivals this week, beginning today, 1 June, are: Sunday—Blessed Frédéric Ozanam; Monday—Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary; Tuesday—St. Peter Claver; Wednesday—St. Thomas of Villanova; Thursday—St. Cyprian; Friday—Most Holy Name of the Blessed Virgin Mary; Saturday—St. John Chrysostom.
  • Eastern Orthodox Christianity: Here are the commemmorations for SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday; and Saturday.
  • Asatru/Heathenry: Some Asatru sects honor Arminius / Herman of the Cherusci, the Germanic chieftain responsible for the victory of Teutoberg Forest against the Romans.
  • Religio Romana: We are in the middle of the Ludi Romani, the oldest set of games celebrated in the city of Rome, held in honor of Jupiter (and later on, Julius Caesar). // Saturday, 13 September, commemorates the dedication of the Capitoline Temple of Iuppiter Optimus Maximus (Jupiter Best and Greatest), so it is is appropriate to have an epulum (banquet, feast, or even just an offered meal) to Iuppiter and the other two members of the Capitoline Triad, Iuno and Minerva.
  • Kemeticism: The Kemetic Roundtable posts on akhu veneration are up (you can view them here).  The new composition topic is Ma’at and isfet, how you identify those concepts, and what role they play in your practice.  Posts on this topic will be published on September 10th.
  • Natib Qadish: Sundown on Monday, 8 September, marks the Mlatu, or Full Moon, of the month of Niqalu.
  • Ekklesia Antinoou: On Monday, 8 September, the Ekklesia celebrates a holy day to Apollo in His epithets of Soranus and Karneios.
  • Thiasos of the Starry Bull: Tuesday, 9 September, marks a festival to Melinoe, the shadowy, shape-changing Guardian of the Forgotten and Maddened Dead.

Blog Highlight:

  • We here at Home, Hearth, and Heart stand in full agreement with Polytheist.com concerning the events of this past week: “The very act of stripping a person or a group of their right to identity is counter to everything in Polytheist movements and efforts, just as it is counter to basic human rights. It is a disgusting violation unbecoming of any community in any land or context anywhere in our world….These assaults will never be tolerated on our watch.”

Article Highlights:

See anything this past week in the pagan or polytheist spheres of Tumblr that made you cheer?  Any posts that made you proud to be on the path you follow?  Any people or bloggers that you feel others should read?  Or do you know of a festival or event coming up that you would like to share?  Send them in!

This weekly round-up post may end up catering primarily to Hellenic Polytheists, but any pagan faith can submit recommendations if they want to.  Posts, events, and other items will be posted at Your Mod’s discretion.

Self-Care Sunday / 12 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Even the most devoted of devotees gets burned out once in a while.  Take a day to rest, relax, and recharge!

  • Do something for yourself.  Even if it means adding five minutes to your short shower, do something to remind yourself that you matter!  Even if your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities are distant or aloof, you always matter to your Home.  YOU ARE IMPORTANT.  Never forget that.
  • Meditate.  Or try to!
  • Do some work around your living space.
  • Spend time with family, friends, or other loved ones.
  • Do something important that matters to YOU, even (especially?) if it’s not related to your religious or spiritual life.
  • Find a book, article, or something else about your religion/spirituality.  Read it (or at least part of it).  Take notes.  Maybe you can post your notes to a blog for others to see!
  • Or do the same with a book about something YOU like that’s not related to your religion or spirituality!

Remember, Devotees: the point we’re making is that you CAN take five minutes out of your day and do something to remind yourself and your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities that you’re thinking of Them!  Take five minutes and remind yourself of your Home.

Don’t obsess!  Just be at home.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 12th of the month of Boedromión.
  • The 12th of Boedromión in ancient Athens marked the festival of the Demokratía, a commemoration of Athens’ unique governmental system.  If you wish to celebrate this holiday today, it is appropriate to offer to Zeus, Themis, and Athene.  If you wish to celebrate your own country’s government, do so on a day that is meaningful to your government’s history (e.g. July 4th for the United States, Bastille Day for France) and honor Zeus, Themis, and the patron God(s) of your country.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 39 and 40 to Demeter and Meter Antaia (an Eleusinian cultic title for Demeter) as well as 26 to Rhea-Kybele, the Mother of the Gods.  (Demeter and Rhea were closely associated in Orphic cosmology.)
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the deutéra mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “day-oo-TEH-rah meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the second of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Setup Saturday / 11 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take a good look at your Home Shrine.  Is it everything you want it to be?  If not, try one of the following:

  • Remove an object that you think no longer belongs on your Home Shrine.  Is it still important to you, or have your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities asked you to keep it?  Put it somewhere else in your living space—so long as it feels like it belongs there!
  • Have something you’ve been meaning to cleanse/purify and add to your altar space?  Today’s the day!
  • Dreaming of the perfect altar?  Put together a Home Shrine Wishlist.  You don’t need to go out and buy everything—but it’s helpful to get an idea of what you want on your altar eventually!
  • Got your Wishlist put together?  Got money?  Go get one of the items on your Wishlist!
  • Something about your Home Shrine setup bugging you, but you can’t put your finger on it?  Try rearranging things and see if you like it better.  (You can always go change it back!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 11th of the month of  Boedromión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 11th of the lunar month marks the beginning of the second decade (period of 10 days in the lunar calendar).  This is a good time to work on plans and projects you developed during the first decade.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 3 and 4 to Ouranos (the Sky) and Aither (one of the five classical elements, seen as a “heavenly fire” or the substance that made up the heavens—that’s a very abrupt summary, mind); 9 to Physis (Nature); and 20 to the Nephelai (Clouds).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the próte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “PROH-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the first of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Submit them or send an ask so Your Mod can post them!