Thank-You Thursday / 4 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Got something you’re thankful for?  Today’s the day to share it!  Try one of the following:

  • Say a prayer of thanksgiving at your Home Shrine.
  • Write a thank-you note to one of your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Leave a thank-you gift at your Home Shrine.  It doesn’t need to be diamonds and Godiva Chocolate—a Jolly Rancher or a found coin might be enough!
  • Take a moment to thank someone close to you for something they did to help you.
  • Or thank them just for being there!
  • Pay your thanks forward—donate to a charity or do a random act of kindness.
  • For those inclined towards Hellenic polytheism: Pandora’s Kharis, a charity fund established by Elani Temperance of Baring the Aegis, has gone through a fallow month for personal reasons on the part of the organizers.  They are, however, ready to get things underway again!  Go to the PK Facebook page and submit ideas for worthy charitable causes!
  • If you would like to honor the dead (especially the Dionysian dead), you can participate in the Thiasos of the Starry Bull’s August Blood Drive.  (You don’t have to be a member of the Thiasos to participate.)  Go donate blood (or plasma, or cells) to the Red Cross, and say a prayer to your ancestors and the dead while you give others the gift of life!
  • Want Your Mod to include other fundraisers organized by pagans, polytheists, or other practitioners?  Send an ask or fanmail!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 4th of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 4th of the lunar month is sacred to Aphrodite, Hermes, and Herakles, as each of them were said to have been born on the 4th day of their birth month.  It is also appropriate to honor Eros and Hermaphroditos on this day.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 27 to Hermes, 54 and 55 to Aphrodite and Adonis, 59 to the Kharites (the Graces, attendants of Aphrodite), 57 to Eros as the Theos of Attraction, and 5 to Protogonos (“The First Born,” a power sometimes equated with Eros especially in Hesiod’s Theogony).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the tetràs histaménou (roughly pronounced “tet-RAHSS hee-stah-MEH-noo”), meaning “the fourth of the beginning [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This first decade is a good time to start new projects!
  • This link will take you to a beautiful tumblr e-shrine to Aphrodite.
  • Here and here are two great tumblr e-shrine to Hermes.
  • Here’s an n-shrine site to Herakles (though the title given is his Roman one, Hercules Invictus).
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections? Send an ask or a fan-mail!

Cleanse-Day Wednesday / 3 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Shrine getting a little dusty?  Time to bust out the barley/natron/vinegar/Windex/elbow grease!  Don’t obsess—just do one of the following:

  • Detail-dust the smaller ornaments on your shrine.
  • Detail-dust the larger ornaments on your shrine.
  • Wash and dry your altar-cloths.
  • Take a damp rag (or other appropriate cleansing item) and give your icons/eidola/images a mini-bath.
  • Wipe, dust, or otherwise clean your altar base (or the piece of furniture where your altar is located).
  • Sweep, mop, or vacuum the floor around your altar space.
  • Offer some incense, sprinkle some khernips, smoke-cleanse, or otherwise purify your altar-space ritually.
  • Altar’s spotless?  Tackle a mess in another room of your living space.  Cleanliness is next to godliness!
  • Stressed out?  Emotional and psychological cleansing is important, too.  Do something to purify or detox yourself!

We’d love to see you all reblog with pictures of your shiny altars!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 3rd of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 3rd of the lunar month, sometimes called the Tritomenis, is sacred to Athene.  It’s said that Athene was born on the third of the month, so the third of EVERY month is dedicated to Her.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 31 and 32 to Athene and Nike.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the tríte histaménou (roughly pronounced “TREE-tay hee-stah-MEH-noo”), meaning “the third of the beginning [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This first decade is a good time to start new projects!
  • Check out this nshrine page to Athene, made by tumblr user skybluecrocodile!  You can leave prayers and light a digital candle to Her here.
  • You can also visit this tumblr e-shrine to Athene!
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections? Send an ask or a fan-mail!

Tasty Tuesday / 2 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Time for some noms!  Try something along these lines:

  • Offer some food your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities would like on your Home Shrine.
  • Offer some food YOU like on your Home Shrine.
  • Same as the above, but with drinks.
  • Make something to eat and dedicate the time/effort to your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Make something to eat and give it away to loved ones, or to people who need the food.
  • Donate to a local Food Bank.
  • Practice some Kitchen Witchery.
  • Submit a recipe to Ritual Recipes!  (Or find something there that you’d like to make!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 2nd of the month of Metageitnión.
  • It is also the Herakleia, a festival devoted to Herakles, the best-known of Hellenic heroes and one of the few mortal heroes who became deified!  Today, it is appropriate to do things that honor and imitate the Hero and His actions.  Large feasts are a good idea (set aside a generous helping for Herakles!), as are drinking contests, contests of strength, and telling stories about Herakles and His adventures.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 2nd of the lunar month is sacred to the Agathos Daimon (or Agathodaimon), the serpent-shaped Theos who helps protect the home and ensure the propserity if its inhabitants.  (Some say the Agathodaimon is a manifestation of Zeus or another Theos like Hermes, and others say it’s tied to the worshipper’s ancestors.)
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 72 to the Daimon and 19 to Zeus Astrapaios (the aspect of Zeus that controls and wields lightning).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the deutéra histaménou (roughly pronounced “day-oo-TEH-rah hee-stah-MEH-noo”), meaning “the second of the beginning [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This first decade is a good time to start new projects!
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections? Send an ask or a fan-mail!

Music Monday / 1 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take five and play some music at your home shrine.  Try doing one (or more than one, or all) of the following:

  • Put a favorite song on the radio and play it at your Home Shrine.  Don’t forget to invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to accept the offering (or even join in)!
  • Dance to the music.
  • Sing something.
  • Play a musical instrument?  Play a song or solo!
  • Dedicate some music practice to one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.

Spread the devotion (and, more importantly, the good music) by reblogging this post with your song of choice!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 1st of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 1st of the lunar month is sacred to all Theoi, but especially Apollon Noumenios (the aspect of Apollon that oversees safe transition into a new month), Selene, and all Household Theoi (including but not limited to Hekate, Hermes, Zeus Ktesios, and the Agathodaimon).  Hellenismo also lists Helios, Hera, and Artemis Noumenia (Artemis of the New Moon) as holy Theoi for this day.  You don’t need to go overboard in your devotions—at least honor Apollon Noumenios and Selene, Titaness of the Moon!
  • Keep an eye out for: the Herakleia, held on the 2nd of the lunar month, during which it is appropriate to hold feasts in the God’s honor; and the Eleusinia, during which the Goddesses Demeter and Persephone are honored as Patrons of the agricultural and harvest calendars. 
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 33 to Apollon and 75 to the Mousai.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the months is called the noumenía (roughly pronounced “noo-men-EE-yah”), meaning “the new moon.”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  The first decade is considered to be a good time for starting new projects.
  • Go visit this Tumblr e-shrine to Selene!
  • Also check out this e-shrine to Apollon!
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections? Send an ask or a fan-mail!

HHH Weekly Roundup: 27 July - 2 August 2014


This Week’s Hellenic Calendar Reminders:

  • Today, 27 July, marks the last day of the lunar month.  Today is a good day to honor the dead and the Khthonioi (Underworld Gods).
  • The Noumenia, or beginning of the new lunar month of Metageitnión, occurs at sundown tonight.
  • The first day of the lunar month (Monday, 28 July) is sacred to Apollon Noumenios (among others).
  • The second day of the lunar month (Tuesday, 29 July) is sacred to the Agathos Daimon, the serpent-shaped spirit in charge of the prosperity of the house and its inhabitants.
  • The second day of Metageitnión is also thought to be the date of Athens’ Herakleia, a festival to the deified hero Herakles.  It’s a good day for big feasts, drinking contests, and hero stories.
  • The third day of the lunar month (Wednesday, 30 July) is sacred to Athene.
  • The fourth day of the lunar month (Thursday, 31 July) is sacred to Aphrodite, Hermes, Eros, and Herakles.  It is also appropriate to honor genderqueer deities such as Hermaphroditos.
  • The fifth day of the lunar month (Friday, 1 August) is sacred to Themis, Dike, and Horkos (the personification of oath), as well as other deities involved in law enforcement and justice.  It is thought to be a difficult day for oath-breakers in particular.
  • The sixth day of the lunar month (Saturday, 2 August) is sacred to Artemis.
  • The seventh day of the lunar month (Sunday, 3 August) is sacred to Apollon.

Festivals in Other Traditions:

  • Hinduism: On Friday, 1 August, many people throughout India and Nepal will celebrate Nag Panchami, a festival dedicated to snakes as servants of the Gods.
  • Christianity: Friday, 1 August, marks the feast of St. Peter in Chains (in honor of the saint’s delivery from prison); in some church traditions, especially in England, this day is also called Lammas and is associated with the first fruits of the harvest.  Both the Western and Eastern churches will hold  Blessings of the First Fruits today, if they don’t hold them on the 6th of August.
  • Roman Catholicism: Saints’ festivals this week, beginning today, 1 June, are: Sunday—Blessed Antonio Lucci; Monday—St. Leopold Mandic; Tuesday—St. Martha; Wednesday—St. Peter Chrysologus; Thursday—St. Ignatius of Loyola; Friday—St. Alphonsus Liguori; Saturday—St. Eusebius of Vercelli.
  • Eastern Orthodox Christianity: Here are the commemmorations for SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday; and Saturday.
  • Islam: The holy fasting month of Ramadan ends tonight at sundown!  It’s the celebration of Eid-al-Fitr, during which all Muslims are encouraged to feast.
  • Pagan/Neowicca (Northern Hemisphere): In the various pagan traditions that celebrate the Wheel of the Year, Friday 1 August is the celebration of Lammas/Lughnasadh in the Northern Hemisphere.  Lammas celebrates the beginning of the harvest, and so is considered a time of thanksgiving for all we’ve received, all we will receive, and all those who have sacrificed for us.  The Goddess enters her Crone phase on this day.
  • Pagan/Neowicca (Southern Hemisphere): In the various pagan traditions that celebrate the Wheel of the Year, Friday 1 August is the celebration of Imbolc in the Southern Hemisphere.  Imbolc is the first of the spring celebrations, when there is just a hint that winter will end, and so it celebrates purification of the old to make way for the new.  On this day, the God continues to grow and mature, and the Goddess recovers from childbirth to become the Maiden.
  • Religio Romana: Wednesday, 20 July, celebrates the dedication of the Temple of This Day’s Fortune.  Friday, 1 August, is the Kalends of the month, and marks celebrations for the “Two Victories” of the Palatine Hill, as well as the dedication of the Temple of Spes (Hope) in the Forum Holitorium.
  • Kemeticism: Your Mod is looking for someone to help her get her Kemetic dates straight.  Any volunteers?  Additionally, the new round of Kemetic Roundtable posts is up (you can view it here).  The new topic, to be posted on 13 August, is Akhu basics: Do akhu play a role in your practice? How do you work with the akhu (shrines, rites, etc)? How do you set up an akhu practice?
  • Celtic Polytheism: The festival of Lughnasadh or Lammas is celebrated on 1 August (or the night previous).  While there are multiple traditions concerning this festival, two stick out primarily: first, that it honors the death of Lugh’s foster-mother Tailtiu, and originates from Her funeral games; and second, that it commemmorates Lugh’s victory over Bres, from which the knowledge of planting and harvesting came to humans.  Breadmaking, berry-picking, and outdoor meals are all traditional for this holiday.
  • Shinto: Friday, 1 August, commemorates the day that cluster-bomb munitions use was banned, and some Shinto sects encourage their followers to mourn the victims of cluster-bomb munitions on this day.
  • Ekklesia Antinoou: Thursday, 31 July, celebrates the syncretization of River Gods with Antinous; Friday, 1 August, marks both Lughnasadh and the birthday of the Ekklesia.
  • Thiasos of the Starry Bull: The Feast of the Dionysian Kings takes place on Friday, 1 August.

Blog Highlight:

  • Not a blog, this time, but a website: in honor of the end of the lunar month, which for us Hellenic polytheists is associated with the dead and the Underworld Gods, Your Mod would like to present you all with TendAGrave.
  • Registration with this website is free, and its purpose is to help people whose family graves are located too far away to tend properly.  For example, if you live in Idaho but some of your family members are buried in Alabama, you can check out who in Alabama might be close enough to help look after those graves for you.  You can also volunteer to tend specific graves in your vicinity if someone asks you for help.
  • It looks like the majority of this site’s users live in the UK, but if more of our US followers register, we can help each other out here in the States, too!

Article Highlights:

Covering two weeks’ worth, so there will be a few more here than normal—and there will be a lot of ones pertaining to the Polytheism Leadership Conference from last weekend!

See anything this past week in the pagan or polytheist spheres of Tumblr that made you cheer?  Any posts that made you proud to be on the path you follow?  Any people or bloggers that you feel others should read?  Or do you know of a festival or event coming up that you would like to share?  Send them in!

This weekly round-up post may end up catering primarily to Hellenic Polytheists, but any pagan faith can submit recommendations if they want to.  Posts, events, and other items will be posted at Your Mod’s discretion.

Self-Care Sunday / 29 Hekatombaión 2.698


Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 29th of the month of Hekatombaión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 29th of the lunar month, which in this case is the last day of the month, is sacred to the spirits of the dead and the Khthonioi (Underworld Gods), especially Hekate and Plouton.
  • It is considered appropriate on this day to reflect on the events of the last month, as well as your own actions; to plan for the up-coming month; and even to fast, as the Neoplatonic philosopher Proklos did.
  • Remember, though: at dusk this evening, the new month of Skirophorión begins—and it’s totally appropriate to celebrate and hold rituals for the Theoi of the Noumenia (New Moon)!  These Theoi include (but aren’t limited to) Apollon Noumenios (the aspect of Apollon that oversees safe transition into a new month), Selene, and all Household Theoi (such as Hekate, Hermes, Zeus Ktesios, and the Agathodaimon).
  • Today is also the final day of the Panathenaía.
  • The Panathenaía was founded by the semi-mythic Athenian hero Erekhtheûs (or Erikhthónios, but even the ancient Hellenes mixed the two up) and renewed again by the tyrant Peisístratos.  During the festival, sacrifices were made to Athene, Poseidon, and Erekhtheûs atop the Akrópolis.  Every four years, the festival was called the Greater Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mégala) and was marked by a series of panhellenic games.  This year, though, we celebrate the Lesser Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mikrá).

  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns to Hekate (beginning at the line, “I call Einodian Hecate, lovely dame” of "To Musaeus"), as well as 56 to Hermes Khthonios, 86 to Thanatos (Death), 17 to Plouton (Haides), 28 to Persephone, and 70 to Melinoe (a night-wandering Theos who was in charge of ghosts and spirits of the dead).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the triakàs (roughly pronounced “tree-ah-KAHSS”), meaning “the thirtieth.”  It may be the 29th, but it was commonplace to call the last day of the month the triakas no matter what the date actually was.
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Feel like visiting some khthonic e-shrines?  Try the Telesterion, an e-shrine to Persephone; or the Hekatesion, an e-shrine to Hekate.
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections? Send an ask or a fan-mail!

Setup Saturday / 28 Hekatombaión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take a good look at your Home Shrine.  Is it everything you want it to be?  If not, try one of the following:

  • Remove an object that you think no longer belongs on your Home Shrine.  Is it still important to you, or have your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities asked you to keep it?  Put it somewhere else in your living space—so long as it feels like it belongs there!
  • Have something you’ve been meaning to cleanse/purify and add to your altar space?  Today’s the day!
  • Dreaming of the perfect altar?  Put together a Home Shrine Wishlist.  You don’t need to go out and buy everything—but it’s helpful to get an idea of what you want on your altar eventually!
  • Got your Wishlist put together?  Got money?  Go get one of the items on your Wishlist!
  • Something about your Home Shrine setup bugging you, but you can’t put your finger on it?  Try rearranging things and see if you like it better.  (You can always go change it back!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 28th of the month of Hekatombaión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The next-to-last day of the month in the Hellenic calendar is sacred to the Khthonioi—the Theoi and daimones related to the Underworld.  As the moon grows darker, Their influence increases.  Now is a good time to honor the Underworld Gods, or at least pour a libation to the spirits of the deceased in your own family.
  • At sundown tonight, which is when the last day of the lunar month begins, it’s traditional to leave an offering of a meal to Hekate at your nearest crossroads.  This meal is there to help honor and strengthen Hekate, as she is a patron of travellers and lost souls—hence the crossroads location.  This has sometimes been colored by modern polytheists as an act of charity (the poor or homeless would often eat these offerings because they needed food), but no ancient sources associate the offering with a charitable act.  Those of you whose practice tends to be more reconstructionist in nature will want to keep it as an offering to the Theos.
  • If you live in a heavily-trafficked area or aren’t confident in leaving offerings in public places, you can leave the meal out somewhere inconspicuous for Her.  (Your Mod tends to leave it on the back patio table.  If you’re going to leave it on your property, though, either make sure it’s completely biodegradable or clean it up after a few hours!)
  • Today is also the sixth day of the seven-day-long Lesser Panathenaía.
  • The Panathenaía was founded by the semi-mythic Athenian hero Erekhtheûs (or Erikhthónios, but even the ancient Hellenes mixed the two up) and renewed again by the tyrant Peisístratos.  During the festival, sacrifices were made to Athene, Poseidon, and Erekhtheûs atop the Akrópolis.  Every four years, the festival was called the Greater Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mégala) and was marked by a series of panhellenic games.  This year, though, we celebrate the Lesser Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mikrá).

  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 76 and 78 to Mnemosyne and Themis (Memory and Custom).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the deutéra phthínontos (roughly pronounced “day-oo-TAY-rah f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the second [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Submit them or send an ask so Your Mod can post them!

Fun and Fancy Friday / 27 Hekatombaión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Today is a day to do something crazy, creative, or otherwise just plain old fun at your  Home Shrine!

  • Today’s Challenge: Try a form of devotion you’ve always wanted to, but felt too intimidated to attempt.  Never tried burning loose incense?  Give it a go (as long as you are doing so safely and within safety regulations—remember, dorms have rules against smoke for the sake of people who have allergies to it)!  Never tried writing a hymn, but always wanted to?  Try it!  Always wanted to make paper dolls for one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits so you can “dress them up” in clothing they would like?  Now’s as good a time as any!  And if it requires time, begin it today and set yourself an end date: “by XYZ day, I should have made a set of paper dolls for Aphrodite, complete with different earrings and necklaces done in gold paint.”

Reblog with your stories (or with the other fun stuff you do at your shrine today)!  Remember, not ALL devotions have to be super-serious!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 27th of the month of Hekatombaión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Today is the fifth day of the seven-day-long Lesser Panathenaía.
  • The Panathenaía was founded by the semi-mythic Athenian hero Erekhtheûs (or Erikhthónios, but even the ancient Hellenes mixed the two up) and renewed again by the tyrant Peisístratos.  During the festival, sacrifices were made to Athene, Poseidon, and Erekhtheûs atop the Akrópolis.  Every four years, the festival was called the Greater Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mégala) and was marked by a series of panhellenic games.  This year, though, we celebrate the Lesser Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mikrá).

  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 21, 22, 23, and 24 to Thalassa, Nereus, the Nereides, and Proteus.  These Daimones all have one thing in common: the sea!
  • Thalassa is Greek for “Sea,” and was one of the primal deities associated with deep water; she is supposed to be the creator of all fish.  (Your link will tell you that She is the same as Tethys, the Titan associated with fresh water springs, but this is a late association—Hellenistic polytheists will be fine conflating the two, but anyone whose rituals are more Classically-influenced will want to keep Them separate.)
  • Nereus is the Old Man of the Sea, the father of the seashore- and current-nymphs the Nereides, and a shape-shifting prophet.
  • Proteus is another shape-shifting, prophesying sea-Daimon, but He specifically tends to seals.  He may also have been an import of another god from further east, such as the Phoenikian Melqart.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the tríte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “TREE-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the third [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Submit them or send an ask so Your Mod can post them!

Thank-You Thursday / 26 Hekatombaión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Got something you’re thankful for?  Today’s the day to share it!  Try one of the following:

  • Say a prayer of thanksgiving at your Home Shrine.
  • Write a thank-you note to one of your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Leave a thank-you gift at your Home Shrine.  It doesn’t need to be diamonds and Godiva Chocolate—a Jolly Rancher or a found coin might be enough!
  • Take a moment to thank someone close to you for something they did to help you.
  • Or thank them just for being there!
  • Pay your thanks forward—donate to a charity or do a random act of kindness.
  • For those inclined towards Hellenic polytheism: Pandora’s Kharis, a charity fund established by Elani Temperance of Baring the Aegis, has finished accepting donations for Medical and Scientific Aid for Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia.  They raised $100 US, so thank you if you donated!  Keep an eye on the PK Facebook page for announcements about upcoming charity drives.
  • Want Your Mod to include other fundraisers organized by pagans, polytheists, or other practitioners?  Send an ask or fanmail!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 26th of the month of Hekatombaión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 26th of the lunar month is not traditionally associated with any Olympian Theoi.
  • Today is the fourth day of the seven-day-long Lesser Panathenaía.
  • The Panathenaía was founded by the semi-mythic Athenian hero Erekhtheûs (or Erikhthónios, but even the ancient Hellenes mixed the two up) and renewed again by the tyrant Peisístratos.  During the festival, sacrifices were made to Athene, Poseidon, and Erekhtheûs atop the Akrópolis.  Every four years, the festival was called the Greater Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mégala) and was marked by a series of panhellenic games.  This year, though, we celebrate the Lesser Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mikrá).

  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 73 and 74 to Leukothea and Palaimon.  These two deities were originally humans, a mother and son (respectively) who went by the names Ino and Melikertes.
  • The story goes that Ino, a sister of Semele the mother of Dionysos, chose to foster Dionysos after the young Wine-God’s disastrous birth.  Hera, jealous of Zeus’ affair with Semele and enraged against Dionysos, punished Ino and her family for daring to help the god out.  Hera drove Athamas, Ino’s husband, into a murderous rage during which he killed his and Ino’s eldest son, Learkhes.  He prepared to slay Ino and Melikertes, but before he could, Ino grabbed Melikertes and jumped off a cliff to their deaths in the sea below.  The sea gods and nymphai took pity on the pair, and transformed them into deities in their own right, renamed as Leukothea and Palaimon.  Ancient sailors called on these two Theoi to help them in distress.  If you are in the Navy, or practice any sort of sport on the water, these two are good Theoi to pray and offer to!
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the tetràs phthínontos (roughly pronounced “tet-RAHSS f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the fourth [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Submit them or send an ask so Your Mod can post them!

Cleanse-Day Wednesday / 25 Hekatombaión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Shrine getting a little dusty?  Time to bust out the barley/natron/vinegar/Windex/elbow grease!  Don’t obsess—just do one of the following:

  • Detail-dust the smaller ornaments on your shrine.
  • Detail-dust the larger ornaments on your shrine.
  • Wash and dry your altar-cloths.
  • Take a damp rag (or other appropriate cleansing item) and give your icons/eidola/images a mini-bath.
  • Wipe, dust, or otherwise clean your altar base (or the piece of furniture where your altar is located).
  • Sweep, mop, or vacuum the floor around your altar space.
  • Offer some incense, sprinkle some khernips, smoke-cleanse, or otherwise purify your altar-space ritually.
  • Altar’s spotless?  Tackle a mess in another room of your living space.  Cleanliness is next to godliness!
  • Stressed out?  Emotional and psychological cleansing is important, too.  Do something to purify or detox yourself!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 25th of the month of Hekatombaión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 25th of the lunar month is not traditionally associated with any Olympian Theoi, though Hesiod suggests it is held sacred to Horkos (the personification of Oath).  It was thought to be a difficult day, particularly for oath-breakers.
  • Today is the third day of the seven-day-long Lesser Panathenaía.
  • The Panathenaía was founded by the semi-mythic Athenian hero Erekhtheûs (or Erikhthónios, but even the ancient Hellenes mixed the two up) and renewed again by the tyrant Peisístratos.  During the festival, sacrifices were made to Athene, Poseidon, and Erekhtheûs atop the Akrópolis.  Every four years, the festival was called the Greater Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mégala) and was marked by a series of panhellenic games.  This year, though, we celebrate the Lesser Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mikrá).
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 5868, and 69 to the Moirai (Fates) and the Erinyes / Eumenides as protectors of sacred oaths.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

A Good Supplement to Our Weekly Roundup!


Your Mod just discovered that The Wild Hunt has an ongoing series called Pagan Community Notes.  Go check it out!

Tasty Tuesday / 24 Hekatombaión 2.698


Welcome Devotees!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 24th of the month of Hekatombaión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 24th of the lunar month is not traditionally associated with any Theoi.
  • Today is the second day of the seven-day-long Lesser Panathenaía.
  • The Panathenaía was founded by the semi-mythic Athenian hero Erekhtheûs (or Erikhthónios, but even the ancient Hellenes mixed the two up) and renewed again by the tyrant Peisístratos.  During the festival, sacrifices were made to Athene, Poseidon, and Erekhtheûs atop the Akrópolis.  Every four years, the festival was called the Greater Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mégala) and was marked by a series of panhellenic games.  This year, though, we celebrate the Lesser Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mikrá).

  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 51, 52, and 53 to Dionysos and His followers: 51 addresses Dionysos as Trieterikos, the god honored with a festival in Thebes every three years; 52 addresses Dionysos as Amphietos, the god honored with an annual festival in Athens; and 53 addresses the Satyroi (half-human, half-goat male worshippers of Dionysos), Seilenoi (half-human, half-horse/donkey male worshippers of Dionysos), and Mainades (female ecstatic worshippers of Dionysos).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hépte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “HEP-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the sixth [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Further information about today’s devotions under the cut.

Read More

Music Monday / 23 Hekatombaión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take five and play some music at your home shrine.  Try doing one (or more than one, or all) of the following:

  • Put a favorite song on the radio and play it at your Home Shrine.  Don’t forget to invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to accept the offering (or even join in)!
  • Dance to the music.
  • Sing something.
  • Play a musical instrument?  Play a song or solo!
  • Dedicate some music practice to one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.

Spread the devotion (and, more importantly, the good music) by reblogging this post with your song of choice!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 23rd of the month of Hekatombaión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 23rd of the lunar month is sacred to Athene.
  • Today is the first day of the seven-day-long Lesser Panathenaía.
  • The Panathenaía was founded by the semi-mythic Athenian hero Erekhtheûs (or Erikhthónios, but even the ancient Hellenes mixed the two up) and renewed again by the tyrant Peisístratos.  During the festival, sacrifices were made to Athene, Poseidon, and Erekhtheûs atop the Akrópolis.  Every four years, the festival was called the Greater Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mégala) and was marked by a series of panhellenic games.  This year, though, we celebrate the Lesser Panathenaía (Panathenaía tà mikrá).

  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 31 and 32 to Athene and Nike.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hebdóme phthínontos (roughly pronounced “heb-DOH-may f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the seventh [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have corrections or suggetions? Send us an ask or fanmail!

HHH Weekly Roundup: July 20-26, 2014


This Week’s Hellenic Calendar Reminders:

  • Tomorrow, Monday 21 July, marks the beginning of the Lesser Panathenaia (Panathenaía tà mikrà).  It lasts through the end of the lunar month, about a week from today.  While primarily an Athenian holiday, it’s a good time to honor Athene if She is the patron of your profession or region (or if you are Her devotee, obviously).
  • The last three days of the lunar month (in this case, approximately Thursday 24 July - Sunday 27 July) are particularly good days to honor the dead and the Khthonioi (Underworld Gods).
  • Hekate’s Deipnon, and the last day of the lunar month, begins at sundown on Saturday, 26 July.  That night is a good night to leave a meal or offering out to Hekate.
  • The Noumenia, or beginning of the new lunar month of Metageitnión, occurs at sundown on Sunday, 27 July.

Festivals in Other Traditions:

  • Roman Catholicism: Saints’ festivals this week, beginning today, 1 June, are: Sunday—St. Apollinaris; Monday—St. Lawrence of Brindisi; Tuesday—St. Mary Magdalene; Wednesday—St. Bridget; Thursday—St. Sharbel Makhluf; Friday—St. James; Saturday—Sts. Joachim and Anne.
  • Eastern Orthodox Christianity: Here are the commemmorations for SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday; and Saturday.
  • Sikhism: Wednesday, 23 July, marks the birthday celebration of Guru Har Krishan, the eighth Sikh Guru.
  • Islam: We are in the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, so Your Mod suggests tagging posts with food or not-safe-for-work material in them.  Alternately, hide it under a Read-More.  During Ramadan, faithful Muslims fast during the day, and nobody likes being reminded that they’re hungry!  Additionally, Wednesday, 23 July, marks the festival of Laylat al-Qadr, during which faithful Muslims honor the giving of the Quran to Muhammad (pbuh).
  • Religio Romana: Today through Wednesday mark the Ludi Victoriae Caesaris, the games honoring Julius Caesar as conquring hero.  Tuesday, 22 July, marks the anniversary of the dedication of the Temple of Concordia in the city of Rome.  Wednesday, 23 July, is the Neptunalia, a festival of Neptune about which next to nothing is known—except that to celebrate it, the Romans held feasts in temporary huts made of branches and foliage, and there were probably game to accompany it.  Friday, 25 July, marks the Furrinalia, a celebration of a very archaic Dea who may have had some connection to water and drought (given the proximity of this festival to the Neptunalia).
  • Kemeticism: Kemetics in the Northern Hemisphere are celebrating Wep Ronpet, or the Egyptian New Year, this week!  Here is a link to Devo’s recommendations for celebrating this holiday; as for the dates, Your Mod is looking for someone to help her get her Kemetic dates straight.  Any volunteers?  Additionally, the new round of Kemetic Roundtable posts is up (you can view it here).  The new topic, to be posted on 13 August, is Akhu basics: Do akhu play a role in your practice? How do you work with the akhu (shrines, rites, etc)? How do you set up an akhu practice?
  • Natib Qadish: The Chudthu, or Dark Moon/End of the Lunar Month, occurs at sundown on Saturday, 26 July.
  • Ekklesia Antinoou: Monday, 21 July, marks the Confirmation of the Tetrad; Wednesday, 23 July, marks the syncretization of Poseidon and Antinous (on the date of the Roman Neptunalia); Friday, 25 July, marks the rising of the Dog Star Sirius, and with it, festivals of Antinous Kynegetikos, Hermanubis, and the syncretization of Antinous with Adonis and Aristaios.

Blog Highlight:

  • Your Mod had the privilege of attending a lecture on the concept of The One in Platonic philosophy this past weekend.  The person giving the lecture, Edward Butler, has his own blog at Henadology, where you can find his writings, several of which have been published and all of which are worth a read.  Go check it out!

Article Highlights:

Covering two weeks’ worth, so there will be a few more here than normal—and there will be a lot of ones pertaining to the Polytheism Leadership Conference from last weekend!

  • The Keynote Lecture at the Polytheism Leadership Conference, on Organized Polytheism, was given by Rev. Tamara Siuda of the House of Netjer.  Read on—there is a lot of good info about achieving state and federal incorporation for religious groups!  Link requires Adobe.
  • Though Costel Hildr hasn’t posted his presentation, he has described his experience at and thoughts on the Conference.
  • Rhyd Wildermuth’s thoughts on the Conference and on how it can be difficult to see people in the words they write.
  • Here is Edward Butler’s paper “On the Gods and the Good,” a critique of the academic tendency to approach Platonic concepts of Goodness and Unity from monotheistic or atheistic perspectives.
  • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus’ debrief on the PLC.
  • Sannion writes about what polytheists are at war with.
  • Elani Temperance writes on deities and patronage.
  • Devo has a fun idea for celebrating Wep Ronpet.

See anything this past week in the pagan or polytheist spheres of Tumblr that made you cheer?  Any posts that made you proud to be on the path you follow?  Any people or bloggers that you feel others should read?  Or do you know of a festival or event coming up that you would like to share?  Send them in!

This weekly round-up post may end up catering primarily to Hellenic Polytheists, but any pagan faith can submit recommendations if they want to.  Posts, events, and other items will be posted at Your Mod’s discretion.

Self-Care Sunday / 22 Hekatombaión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Even the most devoted of devotees gets burned out once in a while.  Take a day to rest, relax, and recharge!

  • Do something for yourself.  Even if it means adding five minutes to your short shower, do something to remind yourself that you matter!  Even if your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities are distant or aloof, you always matter to your Home.  YOU ARE IMPORTANT.  Never forget that.
  • Meditate.  Or try to!
  • Do some work around your living space.
  • Spend time with family, friends, or other loved ones.
  • Do something important that matters to YOU, even (especially?) if it’s not related to your religious or spiritual life.
  • Find a book, article, or something else about your religion/spirituality.  Read it (or at least part of it).  Take notes.  Maybe you can post your notes to a blog for others to see!
  • Or do the same with a book about something YOU like that’s not related to your religion or spirituality!

Remember, Devotees: the point we’re making is that you CAN take five minutes out of your day and do something to remind yourself and your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities that you’re thinking of Them!  Take five minutes and remind yourself of your Home.

Don’t obsess!  Just be at home.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 22nd of the month of Hekatombaión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Hellenismo suggests that the 22nd is sacred to Athene, though You Mod has not found any sources to corroborate this.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 30 to the Kouretes and 38 to Korybas (a member of the Korybantes).
  • The Kouretes and Korybantes were both groups (usually trios, groups of five, or groups of nine) of Theoi or Daimones depicted as warlike men, and They were given charge of sacred mysteries.  The Kouretes were also supposedly given the job of protecting baby Zeus from his father Kronos, and did a loud war-dance as part of Their job of being a divine distraction.  The Kouretes were originally from Crete, and the Korybantes from Samothrace, though the two groups were heavily associated with one another and confused with one another even in ancient Hellas.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the ogdóe phthínontos (roughly pronounced “ogg-DOH-ay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the eighth [until] the ending [of the month].” 
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!