Fun and Fancy Friday / 3 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Today is a day to do something crazy, creative, or just plain fun at your Home Shrine.

  • Today’s Challenge: Go outside for a few minutes and take a walk.  Find something on your walk that you can bring back to offer to your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.
  • Do circumstances not allow you to go outside today?  (Long work hours?  Bad weather?  Sunlight allergy?)  Then find something around your house that can make a good offering.  It doesn’t have to be really elaborate, as long as it’s appropriate!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 3rd of the month of Boedromión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 3rd of the lunar month, sometimes called the Tritomenis, is sacred to Athene.  It’s said that Athene was born on the third of the month, so the third of EVERY month is dedicated to Her.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 31 and 32 to Athene and Nike.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the tríte histaménou (roughly pronounced “TREE-tay hee-stah-MEH-noo”), meaning “the third of the beginning [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This first decade is a good time to start new projects!
  • Check out this nshrine page to Athene, made by tumblr user skybluecrocodile!  You can leave prayers and light a digital candle to Her here.
  • You can also visit this tumblr e-shrine to Athene!
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections? Send an ask or a fan-mail!

Thank-You Thursday / 2 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Got something you’re thankful for?  Today’s the day to share it!  Try one of the following:

  • Say a prayer of thanksgiving at your Home Shrine.
  • Write a thank-you note to one of your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Leave a thank-you gift at your Home Shrine.  It doesn’t need to be diamonds and Godiva Chocolate—a Jolly Rancher or a found coin might be enough!
  • Take a moment to thank someone close to you for something they did to help you.
  • Or thank them just for being there!
  • Pay your thanks forward—donate to a charity or do a random act of kindness.
  • For those inclined towards Hellenic polytheism: today is the last day that Pandora’s Kharis, a charity fund established by Elani Temperance of Baring the Aegis, will be accepting donations for The Trevor Project, a fundraiser to provide crisis counseling and suicide prevention services for young LGBTQIA* people.  Thank you if you have donated!
  • Want Your Mod to include other fundraisers organized by pagans, polytheists, or other practitioners?  Send an ask or fanmail!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 2nd of the month of Boedromión.
  • It is also the Niketeria, an Athenian celebration of Athene’s patronage of their city—if you are a devotee of Athene, today is a good day to celebrate Her!  (You can also look into scheduling your own Niketeria if there is an important victory in your area’s history.)
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 2nd of the lunar month is sacred to the Agathos Daimon (or Agathodaimon), the serpent-shaped Theos who helps protect the home and ensure the propserity if its inhabitants.  (Some say the Agathodaimon is a manifestation of Zeus or another Theos like Hermes, and others say it’s tied to the worshipper’s ancestors.)
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 72 to the Daimon and 19 to Zeus Astrapaios (the aspect of Zeus that controls and wields lightning).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the deutéra histaménou (roughly pronounced “day-oo-TEH-rah hee-stah-MEH-noo”), meaning “the second of the beginning [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This first decade is a good time to start new projects!
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections? Send an ask or a fan-mail!

Cleanse-Day Wednesday / 1 Boedromión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Shrine getting a little dusty?  Time to bust out the barley/natron/vinegar/Windex/elbow grease!  Don’t obsess—just do one of the following:

  • Detail-dust the smaller ornaments on your shrine.
  • Detail-dust the larger ornaments on your shrine.
  • Wash and dry your altar-cloths.
  • Take a damp rag (or other appropriate cleansing item) and give your icons/eidola/images a mini-bath.
  • Wipe, dust, or otherwise clean your altar base (or the piece of furniture where your altar is located).
  • Sweep, mop, or vacuum the floor around your altar space.
  • Offer some incense, sprinkle some khernips, smoke-cleanse, or otherwise purify your altar-space ritually.
  • Altar’s spotless?  Tackle a mess in another room of your living space.  Cleanliness is next to godliness!
  • Stressed out?  Emotional and psychological cleansing is important, too.  Do something to purify or detox yourself!

We’d love to see you all reblog with pictures of your shiny altars!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 1st of the month of Boedromión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 1st of the lunar month is sacred to all Theoi, but especially Apollon Noumenios (the aspect of Apollon that oversees safe transition into a new month), Selene, and all Household Theoi (including but not limited to Hekate, Hermes, Zeus Ktesios, and the Agathodaimon).  Hellenismo also lists Helios, Hera, and Artemis Noumenia (Artemis of the New Moon) as holy Theoi for this day.  You don’t need to go overboard in your devotions—at least honor Apollon Noumenios and Selene, Titaness of the Moon!
  • Keep an eye out for: the Niketeria, a celebration of Athene’s victory over Poseidon in the competition for patronage of Athens; the Genesia, a festival to the dead; the Demokratia, a festival in celebration of Athens’ decision to form a democratic government; and the Greater Eleusinia in celebration of Demeter, Persephone, and the grain harvest.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 33 to Apollon and 75 to the Mousai.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the months is called the noumenía (roughly pronounced “noo-men-EE-yah”), meaning “the new moon.”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  The first decade is considered to be a good time for starting new projects.
  • Go visit this Tumblr e-shrine to Selene!
  • Also check out this e-shrine to Apollon!
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections? Send an ask or a fan-mail!

Correction to Roundup Post


Your Mod read her calendar incorrectly—tonight IS the Noumenia, but that means the following corrections should be made to the Hellenic Calendar section of this past Sunday’s post:

  1. Wednesday, 27 Aug., is the first of the month and sacred to Apollon Noumenios, Selene, and the Agathos Daimon.
  2. Thursday, 28 Aug., is the second of the month and sacred to the Agathos Daimon.
  3. Friday, 29 Aug., is the third of the month and sacred to Athene.
  4. Saturday, 30 Aug., is the fourth of the month and sacred to Hermes, Herakles, Aphrodite, Eros, and other Theoi associated with expression of sexuality and gender.

We apologize for the mistakes!  They have been edited in the original post as well.

Tasty Tuesday / 30 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Time for some noms!  Try something along these lines:

  • Offer some food your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities would like on your Home Shrine.
  • Offer some food YOU like on your Home Shrine.
  • Same as the above, but with drinks.
  • Make something to eat and dedicate the time/effort to your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Make something to eat and give it away to loved ones, or to people who need the food.
  • Donate to a local Food Bank.
  • Practice some Kitchen Witchery.
  • Submit a recipe to Ritual Recipes!  (Or find something there that you’d like to make!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 30th of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 30th of the lunar month, which in this case is the last day of the month, is sacred to the spirits of the dead and the Khthonioi (Underworld Gods), especially Hekate, Persephone, and Plouton.
  • It was considered appropriate on this day to reflect on the events of the last month, as well as your own actions; to plan for the up-coming month; and even to fast, as the Neoplatonic philosopher Proklos did.
  • Remember, though: at dusk this evening, the new month of Elaphebolión begins—and it’s totally appropriate to celebrate and hold rituals for the Theoi of the Noumenia (New Moon)!  These Theoi include (but aren’t limited to) Apollon Noumenios (the aspect of Apollon that oversees safe transition into a new month), Selene, and all Household Theoi (such as Hekate, Hermes, Zeus Ktesios, and the Agathodaimon).
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns to Hekate (beginning at the line, “I call Einodian Hecate, lovely dame” of "To Musaeus"), as well as 56 to Hermes Khthonios, 86 to Thanatos (Death), 17 to Plouton (Haides), 28 to Persephone, and 70 to Melinoe (a night-wandering Theos who was in charge of ghosts and spirits of the dead).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the triakàs (roughly pronounced “tree-ah-KAHSS”), meaning “the thirtieth.”  It was commonplace to call the last day of the month the triakas no matter what the date actually was, so sometimes the 29th of a lunar month also goes by this name.
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!
  • Feel like visiting some khthonic e-shrines?  Try the Telesterion, an e-shrine to Persephone; or the Hekatesion and Her Sacred Fires, two e-shrines to Hekate.
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Music Monday / 29 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take five and play some music at your home shrine.  Try doing one (or more than one, or all) of the following:

  • Put a favorite song on the radio and play it at your Home Shrine.  Don’t forget to invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to accept the offering (or even join in)!
  • Dance to the music.
  • Sing something.
  • Play a musical instrument?  Play a song or solo!
  • Dedicate some music practice to one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.

Spread the devotion (and, more importantly, the good music) by reblogging this post with your song of choice!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 29th of the month of Meteageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 29th of the lunar month, which in this case is the day before the last day of the month, is sacred to the spirits of the dead and the Khthonioi (Underworld Gods).  Today is a good day to honor your Ancestors and local powerful dead, if honoring Them isn’t already a regular part of your practice.
  • At sundown tonight, which is when the last day of the lunar month begins, it’s traditional to leave an offering of a meal to Hekate at your nearest crossroads.  This meal is there to help honor and strengthen Hekate, as she is a patron of travellers and lost souls—hence the crossroads location.  This has sometimes been colored by modern polytheists as an act of charity because in ancient Hellas, the poor or homeless would often eat these offerings because they needed food.  No ancient sources actually associate the offering with a charitable act, however—in fact, it was traditionally thought that eating what was offered to the Kthonioi (Underworld Theoi) would bring their wrath.  Those of you whose practice tends to be more reconstructionist in nature will want to keep it as an offering to the Theos.
  • If you live in a heavily-trafficked area or aren’t confident in leaving offerings in public places, you can leave the meal out somewhere inconspicuous for Her.  (Your Mod tends to leave it on the back patio table.  If you’re going to leave it on your property, though, either make sure it’s completely biodegradable or clean it up in a timely fashion!)
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading 79, 80, and 81 to the Winds.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the deutéra phthínontos (roughly pronounced “day-oo-TAY-rah f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the second [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections? Send us an ask or fanmail!

HHH Weekly Roundup: August 24-30 2014


This Week’s Hellenic Calendar Reminders:

  • Today (24 August), tomorrow, and Tuesday are sacred to the Khthonioi (Underworld Gods), the ancestors, and local heroes.  It is a good time to honor the dead.
  • Monday evening (25 August) marks the Dark Moon, or Héne kaì Néa (Old and New).  This is the final night of the lunar month, and it is sacred to Hekate; it is traditional to leave a meal for Hekate and Her train of souls at a local crossroads.
  • Tuesday evening (26 August) marks the Noumenía (New Moon), the first night of the new lunar month of Boedromión.  On this night, it is proper to honor Apollon as Theos of new beginnings (similar in function to the Roman Janus), as well as Selene the Moon and the Agathos Daimon (the spirit of the home and its prosperity).
  • Wednesday, 27 August, is sacred to Apollon Noumenios (Apollon of the New Month), Selene the Moon, and the Agathos Daimon.
  • Thursday, 28 August, is sacred to the Agathos Daimon.
  • In the Athenian calendar, Friday, 29 August, is sacred to Athene (as She is thought to have been born on the third of Her birth month).  In Athens, the 3rd of Boedromión marked the festival to Nike (Victory) know as the Niketería.
  • In the Athenian calendar, Saturday, 30 August, is considered sacred to Hermes, Aphrodite, Eros, Herakles, and any Theoi and Daimones associated with gender identity or sexual expression.

Festivals in Other Traditions:

  • Hinduism: On Thursday, 29 August, some Hindu sects celebrate the Ganesh Chaturthi, a celebration of the (re)birth of Ganesh, the elephant-headed opener of ways and remover of obstacles.  It is traditional to make or purchase a clay image of Ganesh and immerse it in water, to sanctify the image and soften it so the clay can be added to the home garden.
  • Roman Catholicism: Saints’ festivals this week, beginning today, 1 June, are: Sunday—St. Bartholomew; Monday—St. Louis of France; Tuesday—St. Joseph Calasanz; Wednesday—St. Monica; Thursday—St. Augustine of Hippo; Friday—Martyrdom of St. John the Baptist; Saturday—St. Jeanne Jugan.
  • Eastern Orthodox Christianity: Here are the commemmorations for SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday; and Saturday.
  • Religio Romana: Today, 24 August, marks a sacrifice to Luna; it also marks the first of three days during which the mundus, a ceremonial pit dedicated to Ceres, was open and awaiting offerings to Ceres and the dead.  //  Monday, 25 August, marks the Opiconsivia, a sacrifice and festival to Ops, the chthonic Dea of Plenty.  //  Wednesday, 27 August, marks the Volturnalia, a festival to the indigenous Italian god of rivers and flowing water (identified later on with the Tiber River specifically).  //  Thursday, 28 August, marked a chariot race for Sol and Luna in the Circus Maximus.
  • Kemeticism: The newest round of Kemetic Roundtable posts is up (you can view it here).  The new composition topic is Ma’at and isfet, how you identify those concepts, and what role they play in your practice.  Posts on this topic will be published on September 10th.
  • Natib Qadish: Monday, 25 August, marks the Chudthu (New Moon) and first holiday of the Canaanite holy year.  Known as ‘Ashuru Mathbati, it is traditional to build temporary shrines from cut branches to house images of the Gods.  Decorate these shrines and fill them with offerings, and talk to the Gods about things you don’t normally discuss with them.  (Correct me if I’m wrong—I may have misunderstood Tess Dawson’s description!)
  • Shinto: On Tuesday and Wednesday, 26-27 August, some regions of Japan celebrate the Dai-Chochin Matsuri, or Giant Lantern Festival, during which giant paper lanterns decorated with scenes from myths and history are illuminated by giant candles.
  • Rodnovery (Slavic Polytheism): Beginning on Thursday, 28 August, is a period of time lasting until 22 September known as the Medjudnevnica.  It is holy to Dajbog, the elderly Underworld Sun who helps tend the coals that keep people warm at night and knows where all gold and silver is hidden.  As He is able to grant gifts of prosperity, it is considered a good time to offer His dwarf-servants gold and silver at caves and tunnels so they will bring good fortune.
  • Ekklesia Antinoou: Friday, 29 August, marks the commemoration of Diva Matidia being named Augusta in 112 CE.
  • Thiasos of the Starry Bull: The night of Thursday, 28 August, marks the Pannykhis (All-Night Vigil) of Ariadne, the Bride of the Starry Bull.

Blog Highlight:

  • Today’s blog is for Your Mod’s fellow Hellenic Polytheists (though many other paths may appreciate it as well).  It’s called Greek Revivalist Mommy, and it’s made up of posts exploring various pieces of Hellenic wisdom and aspects of festivals or daily religious life.  The posts don’t have the depth of some other bloggers—but GRM is a pretty busy lady!  It’s nice to see blogs from people who don’t have all the time in the world to post.

Article Highlights:

See anything this past week in the pagan or polytheist spheres of Tumblr that made you cheer?  Any posts that made you proud to be on the path you follow?  Any people or bloggers that you feel others should read?  Or do you know of a festival or event coming up that you would like to share?  Send them in!

This weekly round-up post may end up catering primarily to Hellenic Polytheists, but any pagan faith can submit recommendations if they want to.  Posts, events, and other items will be posted at Your Mod’s discretion.

Self-Care Sunday / 28 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Even the most devoted of devotees gets burned out once in a while.  Take a day to rest, relax, and recharge!

  • Do something for yourself.  Even if it means adding five minutes to your short shower, do something to remind yourself that you matter!  Even if your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities are distant or aloof, you always matter to your Home.  YOU ARE IMPORTANT.  Never forget that.
  • Meditate.  Or try to!
  • Do some work around your living space.
  • Spend time with family, friends, or other loved ones.
  • Do something important that matters to YOU, even (especially?) if it’s not related to your religious or spiritual life.
  • Find a book, article, or something else about your religion/spirituality.  Read it (or at least part of it).  Take notes.  Maybe you can post your notes to a blog for others to see!
  • Or do the same with a book about something YOU like that’s not related to your religion or spirituality!

Remember, Devotees: the point we’re making is that you CAN take five minutes out of your day and do something to remind yourself and your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities that you’re thinking of Them!  Take five minutes and remind yourself of your Home.

Don’t obsess!  Just be at home.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 28th of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 28th of the lunar month, which in this case is three days before the end of the month, was considered sacred to Athene in some locations in Hellas at various points in history; Drew Campbell’s prescriptions do not keep this tradition, though devotees of Athene may wish to.
  • The last three days of the lunar month are good for honoring the Khthonioi (Underworld Theoi and Daimones), including one’s ancestors and local heroes / powerful dead.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 76 and 78 to Mnemosyne and Themis (Memory and Custom).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the tríte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “TREE-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the third [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections? Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Setup Saturday / 27 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take a good look at your Home Shrine.  Is it everything you want it to be?  If not, try one of the following:

  • Remove an object that you think no longer belongs on your Home Shrine.  Is it still important to you, or have your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities asked you to keep it?  Put it somewhere else in your living space—so long as it feels like it belongs there!
  • Have something you’ve been meaning to cleanse/purify and add to your altar space?  Today’s the day!
  • Dreaming of the perfect altar?  Put together a Home Shrine Wishlist.  You don’t need to go out and buy everything—but it’s helpful to get an idea of what you want on your altar eventually!
  • Got your Wishlist put together?  Got money?  Go get one of the items on your Wishlist!
  • Something about your Home Shrine setup bugging you, but you can’t put your finger on it?  Try rearranging things and see if you like it better.  (You can always go change it back!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 27th of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 27th of the lunar month is only associated with Athene if it’s the third day before the end of the month; since Metageitnión has 30 days in it this year, this is not the case.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 21, 22, 23, and 24 to Thalassa, Nereus, the Nereides, and Proteus.  These Daimones all have one thing in common: the sea!
  • Thalassa is Greek for “Sea,” and was one of the primal deities associated with deep water; She is supposed to be the creator of all fish.  (The link will tell you that She is the same as Tethys, the Titaness associated with fresh water springs, but this is a late association—Hellenistic polytheists will be fine conflating the two, but anyone whose rituals are more Classically-influenced will want to keep Them separate.)
  • Nereus is the Old Man of the Sea, the father of the the Nereides (a group of seashore and water-current nymphai), and a shape-shifting prophet.
  • Proteus is another shape-shifting, prophesying sea-Daimon, but He specifically tends to seals.  He may also have been an import of another god from further east, such as an aspect of the Phoenikian Melqart.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the tetràs phthínontos (roughly pronounced “tet-RAHSS f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the fourth [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Fun and Fancy Friday / 26 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Today is a day to do something crazy, creative, or otherwise just plain old fun at your  Home Shrine!

  • Today’s Challenge: Create a painting or drawing of one of your Gods/Entities/Spirits/Thoughtforms and put it up on your Home Shrine.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 26th of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 26th of the lunar month is not traditionally associated with any Theoi.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 73 and 74 to Leukothea and Palaimon.  These two deities were originally humans, a mother and son (respectively) who went by the names Ino and Melikertes.  The story goes that Ino, a sister of Semele the mother of Dionysos, chose to foster Dionysos after the young Wine-God’s disastrous birth.  Hera, jealous of Zeus’ affair with Semele and enraged against Dionysos, punished Ino and her family for daring to help the god out.  Hera drove Athamas, Ino’s husband, into a murderous rage during which he killed his and Ino’s eldest son, Learkhes.  He prepared to slay Ino and Melikertes, but before he could, Ino grabbed Melikertes and jumped off a cliff to their deaths in the sea below.  The sea gods and nymphai took pity on the pair, and transformed them into deities in their own right, renamed as Leukothea and Palaimon.  Ancient sailors called on these two Theoi to help them in distress.  If you are in the Navy, or practice any sort of sport on the water, these two are good Theoi to pray and offer to!
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the pénte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “PEN-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the fifth [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

A Special Thank-You


…goes to those present at the Polytheist Leadership Conference who donated money to RAINN.

The conference raised $549 US to donate!  Awesome work!

Thank-You Thursday / 25 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Got something you’re thankful for?  Today’s the day to share it!  Try one of the following:

  • Say a prayer of thanksgiving at your Home Shrine.
  • Write a thank-you note to one of your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Leave a thank-you gift at your Home Shrine.  It doesn’t need to be diamonds and Godiva Chocolate—a Jolly Rancher or a found coin might be enough!
  • Take a moment to thank someone close to you for something they did to help you.
  • Or thank them just for being there!
  • Pay your thanks forward—donate to a charity or do a random act of kindness.
  • For those inclined towards Hellenic polytheism: Pandora’s Kharis, a charity fund established by Elani Temperance of Baring the Aegis, will be accepting donations for The Trevor Project, a fundraiser to provide crisis counseling and suicide prevention services for young LGBTQIA* people.  The fundraiser will be going on all throughout the Hellenic month of Metageitnión, which means the deadline for donations is Thursday 28 August.  (That’s a week from today!)
  • Want Your Mod to include other fundraisers organized by pagans, polytheists, or other practitioners?  Send an ask or fanmail!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 25th of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Today, Hellenion celebrates a sacred day for Zeus Epoptes, a very ancient Athenian epithet of Zeus that may have to do with keeping the angry or restless dead away from the living.
  • The 25th of the lunar month, like the 5th and 15th, is considered by Hesiod to be a holy and even inauspicious day.  It is sacred to Horkos (the personification of Oath) in Drew Campbell’s notes.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 5868, and 69 to the Moirai (Fates) and the Erinyes / Eumenides as protectors of sacred oaths.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hépte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “HEP-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the sixth [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Cleanse-Day Wednesday / 24 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Shrine getting a little dusty?  Time to bust out the barley/natron/vinegar/Windex/elbow grease!  Don’t obsess—just do one of the following:

  • Detail-dust the smaller ornaments on your shrine.
  • Detail-dust the larger ornaments on your shrine.
  • Wash and dry your altar-cloths.
  • Take a damp rag (or other appropriate cleansing item) and give your icons/eidola/images a mini-bath.
  • Wipe, dust, or otherwise clean your altar base (or the piece of furniture where your altar is located).
  • Sweep, mop, or vacuum the floor around your altar space.
  • Offer some incense, sprinkle some khernips, smoke-cleanse, or otherwise purify your altar-space ritually.
  • Altar’s spotless?  Tackle a mess in another room of your living space.  Cleanliness is next to godliness!
  • Stressed out?  Emotional and psychological cleansing is important, too.  Do something to purify or detox yourself!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 24th of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 24th of the lunar month is not traditionally associated with any Theoi.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 51, 52, and 53 to Dionysos as originator of and reason for festivals.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hebdóme phthínontos (roughly pronounced “heb-DOH-may f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the seventh [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Tasty Tuesday / 23 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Time for some noms!  Try something along these lines:

  • Offer some food your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities would like on your Home Shrine.
  • Offer some food YOU like on your Home Shrine.
  • Same as the above, but with drinks.
  • Make something to eat and dedicate the time/effort to your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Make something to eat and give it away to loved ones, or to people who need the food.
  • Donate to a local Food Bank.
  • Practice some Kitchen Witchery.
  • Submit a recipe to Ritual Recipes!  (Or find something there that you’d like to make!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 23rd of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 23rd of the lunar month is sacred to Athene.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 31 and 32 to Athene and Nike.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the ogdóe phthínontos (roughly pronounced “heb-DOH-may f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the eighth [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Music Monday / 22 Metageitnión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take five and play some music at your home shrine.  Try doing one (or more than one, or all) of the following:

  • Put a favorite song on the radio and play it at your Home Shrine.  Don’t forget to invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to accept the offering (or even join in)!
  • Dance to the music.
  • Sing something.
  • Play a musical instrument?  Play a song or solo!
  • Dedicate some music practice to one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.

Spread the devotion (and, more importantly, the good music) by reblogging this post with your song of choice!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 22nd of the month of Metageitnión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Hellenismo suggests that the 22nd is sacred to Athene, though You Mod has not found any sources to corroborate this.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 30 to the Kouretes and 38 to Korybas (a member of the Korybantes).
  • The Kouretes and Korybantes were both groups (usually trios, groups of five, or groups of nine) of Theoi or Daimones depicted as warlike men, and They were given charge of sacred mysteries.  The Kouretes were also supposedly given the job of protecting baby Zeus from his father Kronos, and did a loud war-dance as part of Their job of being a divine distraction.  The Kouretes were originally from Crete, and the Korybantes from Samothrake, though the two groups were heavily associated with one another and confused with one another even in ancient Hellas.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the enáte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “enn-AH-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the ninth [until] the ending [of the month].” 
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!