Music Monday / 25 Pyanepsión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take five and play some music at your home shrine.  Try doing one (or more than one, or all) of the following:

  • Put a favorite song on the radio and play it at your Home Shrine.  Don’t forget to invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to accept the offering (or even join in)!
  • Dance to the music.
  • Sing something.
  • Play a musical instrument?  Play a song or solo!
  • Dedicate some music practice to one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.

Spread the devotion (and, more importantly, the good music) by reblogging this post with your song of choice!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 25th of the month of Pyanepsión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 25th of the lunar month is not traditionally associated with any Olympian Theoi, though Hesiod suggests it is held sacred to Horkos (the personification of Oath).  It was thought to be a difficult day, particularly for oath-breakers.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 5868, and 69 to the Moirai (Fates) and the Erinyes / Eumenides as protectors of sacred oaths.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

HHH Weekly Roundup: 19-25 October 2014


This Week’s Hellenic Calendar Reminders:

  • The Deipnon Hekates (Hekate’s Dinner) takes place after sundown on Thursday, 23 October.  Leave a meal out, preferably at a crossroads, for Hekate and Her retinue of restless dead.
  • The three days leading up to the Deipnon Hekates are sacred to the Khthonioi (Underworld Gods, Spirits, and Daimones).  It is a good time to honor your ancestors, work with local dead, visit and help beautify cemeteries, etc.
  • Also taking place from sundown on Thursday, 23 October, until sundown on Friday, 24 October, is the ancient Athenian celebration called the Khalkheia (“Bronze Festival”).  This holiday celebrates Athene and Hephaistos as patrons of professions that rely on craftsmanship, especially metalworking.  Depending on where you live, you may wish to celebrate it this week, or you may wish to relocate it to your country’s Labor Day or similar holiday.
  • The Noumenia (New Moon) will be celebrated after sundown on Friday, 24 October.  This will be a good night to honor Apollon Noumenios (Apollon’s aspect as protector of the transition into the new month), Selene the Moon, and the Agathos Daimon (serpent-like household God that protects the good fortune of the house and its inhabitants).

Festivals in Other Traditions:

  • Hinduism: The festival of Diwali begins on Tuesday, 21 October, with Dhanteras, a festival of Lakshmi in which She, as the bringer of wealth of all forms, is invited into each household.  All throughout the five days of Diwali, lamps of all sorts are lit, fireworks are traditional, and sweets are offered to Lakshmi and exchanged as gifts.  The holiday celebrates the triumph of light over darkness and joy over despair, as the Gods bring that blessing to all who worship Them.
  • Roman Catholicism: Saints’ festivals this week, beginning today, 1 June, are: Sunday—Blessed Paul VI; Monday—St. Paul of the Cross; Tuesday—St. Hilarion; Wednesday—St. John Paul II; Thursday—St. John of Capistrano; Friday—St. Anthony Claret; Saturday—St. Antônio de Sant’Anna Galvão.
  • Eastern Orthodox Christianity: Here are the commemmorations for SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday; and Saturday.
  • Sikhism: Sikhs also celebrate Diwali as a victory of truth over ignorance and joy over despair.
  • Islam: Islam celebrates the Hijra, or journey of Muhammad and his followers from Mecca to Medina and the subsequent unification of all Muslims under Muhammad’s leadership, on Saturday, 25 October.
  • Heathenry/Asatru: Depending on where you live and your local calendar, celebrations of Winternights may be taking place around this time; alternately, they may take place closer to 31 October.
  • Religio Romana: Today, 19 October, marks the Armilustrium, a festival of Mars in which the weapons and armor that had been used over the past campaign season were made ritually pure and stored away over the winter until the spring brought the next campaign season.
  • Natib Qadish: The Chudthu, or New Moon, will be celebrated (together with a partial solar eclipse!) on Thursday, 23 October.
  • Shinto: On Wednesday, 22 October, the Kyoto Prefecture will celebrate its Festival of the Ages, a costumed parade celebrating Kyoto’s history.  The Kurama Fire Festival, known for its grand watchfires and torchlit processions, takes place after sundown on the same day.
  • Rodnovery: Saturday, 25 October, will mark the festival of Pokrov, which honores Mokoš/Živa.  It is a good time to leave Her offerings of wool, apples, bread, cottage cheese, and mead; it is also a good time to give thanks for the completed harvest, or for all the good things you have experienced over the course of the past year.  Honor your mother, or maternal figures, on this day if possible.
  • Ekklesia Antinoou: Today, 19 October, marks the Armilustrium (as described above under “Religio Romana”). // Monday, 20 October, marks Spirit Day. // Tuesday, 21 October, marks a festival to Hathor. // Friday, 24 October, marks the sycretism of Osiris and Antinous. // Saturday, 25 October, marks the Panthea.
  • Thiasos of the Starry Bull: Sundown on Friday, 24 October, marks the beginning of the lunar month of Polygetheion (named for Dionysos in his aspect of Polygethes, “Giver of Many Gifts”).

Article Highlights:

See anything this past week in the pagan or polytheist spheres of Tumblr that made you cheer?  Any posts that made you proud to be on the path you follow?  Any people or bloggers that you feel others should read?  Or do you know of a festival or event coming up that you would like to share?  Send them in!

This weekly round-up post may end up catering primarily to Hellenic Polytheists, but any pagan faith can submit recommendations if they want to.  Posts, events, and other items will be posted at Your Mod’s discretion.

Anonymous said: Is there any bews regarding the giveaway? Have the winners been chosen?

Sorry for the lack of updates!  Things have been rather hectic here at home.  The winners have been selected, and the prizes sent out.  Thank you!

watercolorwhispers said: Hi, I just wanted to say that I got my altar set in the mail yesterday and I couldn't be happier. Everything arrived safely and it is all beautiful. Thank you so much! Kayla G

We’re so happy everything arrived!  Thank you for entering!

Anonymous said: I have a complicated situation: I am a devotee of Athene. I've read a lot about Her and feel a very deep connection and take the relationship seriously. But I am also a ceremonial magician of the Golden Dawn tradition, which I also take seriously, and I know how a lot of Hellenic people feel about the corruption of the term "hermeticism". I want to formally venerate Athene. I'm sort of at a loss of how to do both at the same time and yet keep the two practices separate.

This question IS complex, though your situation may not be as complex as you believe it to be.

It sounds as though you are feeling a disparity between what you feel is religiously appropriate and what your peers in the Hellenic polytheist community may think of the same.

Your Mod will give one caveat: she is not a Ceremonial Magician, and so does not know how Hermetic traditions feel about worshipping any Gods, let alone Athene.  We won’t venture to speak for that side.

Your Mod does, however, have contacts with ceremonial magicians who venerate Hellenic Gods, and has never had a problem with their doing so.  The idea that Hermeticism somehow “dilutes” Hellenic polytheistic beliefs stems from two main problems: 1) Hellenic polytheists are already few and far between, so we sometimes get protective (and over-protective) of our traditions, especially when we forget that religion was much more fluid and syncretic in the ancient world than our history books lead us to believe; and 2) we fear that some magical traditions (Chaos Magic, for example) loosely permit what could be perceived as cultural appropriation.  To Your Mod’s knowledge, Hellenic polytheism is an open tradition; we just dislike it when other traditions heavily warp the perception of our Gods.  The most striking example is of Hekate as a Maiden-Mother-Crone Goddess, when she was never historically depicted as such.

Considering that Athene had (and has) chthonic aspects and concerns, as well as maternal aspects and concerns—both of which tend to be ignored by the largely Athenian-inspired cultus of what we might call “standard” Hellenic polytheism—Your Mod is not convinced that the first worry listed above should have as much weight as it does.

That said, your tradition is your own.  If you are worried Athene may be offended, do divination—or have someone divine for you—to see if She has any concerns.

If you are worried that your (hopefully respectful and well-researched!) veneration of Athene is a path you may be barred from or mocked for practicing, ask yourself one question: for whom am I doing this—the Gods, or other people?

Edited later to make the last two paragraphs intelligible.  Your Mod does not type well when trying to rush out the door to run errands.

Self-Care Sunday / 24 Pyanepsión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Even the most devoted of devotees gets burned out once in a while.  Take a day to rest, relax, and recharge!

  • Do something for yourself.  Even if it means adding five minutes to your short shower, do something to remind yourself that you matter!  Even if your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities are distant or aloof, you always matter to your Home.  YOU ARE IMPORTANT.  Never forget that.
  • Meditate.  Or try to!
  • Do some work around your living space.
  • Spend time with family, friends, or other loved ones.
  • Do something important that matters to YOU, even (especially?) if it’s not related to your religious or spiritual life.
  • Find a book, article, or something else about your religion/spirituality.  Read it (or at least part of it).  Take notes.  Maybe you can post your notes to a blog for others to see!
  • Or do the same with a book about something YOU like that’s not related to your religion or spirituality!

Remember, Devotees: the point we’re making is that you CAN take five minutes out of your day and do something to remind yourself and your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities that you’re thinking of Them!  Take five minutes and remind yourself of your Home.

Don’t obsess!  Just be at home.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 24th of the month of Pyanepsión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 24th of the lunar month is not traditionally associated with any Theoi.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 51, 52, and 53 to Dionysos and His followers: 51 addresses Dionysos as Trieterikos, the god honored with a festival in Thebes every three years; 52 addresses Dionysos as Amphietos, the god honored with an annual festival in Athens; and 53 addresses the Satyroi (half-human, half-goat male worshippers of Dionysos), Seilenoi (half-human, half-horse/donkey male worshippers of Dionysos), and Mainades (female ecstatic worshippers of Dionysos).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hépte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “HEP-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the sixth [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Setup Saturday / 23 Pyanepsión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take a good look at your Home Shrine.  Is it everything you want it to be?  If not, try one of the following:

  • Remove an object that you think no longer belongs on your Home Shrine.  Is it still important to you, or have your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities asked you to keep it?  Put it somewhere else in your living space—so long as it feels like it belongs there!
  • Have something you’ve been meaning to cleanse/purify and add to your altar space?  Today’s the day!
  • Dreaming of the perfect altar?  Put together a Home Shrine Wishlist.  You don’t need to go out and buy everything—but it’s helpful to get an idea of what you want on your altar eventually!
  • Got your Wishlist put together?  Got money?  Go get one of the items on your Wishlist!
  • Something about your Home Shrine setup bugging you, but you can’t put your finger on it?  Try rearranging things and see if you like it better.  (You can always go change it back!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 23rd of the month of Pyanepsión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 23rd of the lunar month is sacred to Athene.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 31 and 32 to Athene and Nike.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hebdóme phthínontos (roughly pronounced “heb-DOH-may f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the seventh [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have corrections or suggetions? Send us an ask or fanmail!

Fun and Fancy Friday / 22 Pyanepsión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Today is a day to do something crazy, creative, or otherwise just plain old fun at your  Home Shrine!

  • Today’s Challenge: Perform a random act of kindness to honor your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits (if such is the sort of thing They’d like to see).  Pick up litter in a local spot.  Choose a public place and post a message supporting others who are marginalized.  If you’re crafty, start a project that you intend to donate to charity or give to someone who can use it.  Compliment every cashier you interact with while running errands.  Check out Emotional Baggage Check, a website where you can anonymously leave supportive messages to the people who need kindness right now.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 22nd of the month of Pyanepsión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Hellenismo suggests that the 22nd is sacred to Athene, though You Mod has not found any sources to corroborate this.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 30 to the Kouretes and 38 to Korybas (a member of the Korybantes).
  • The Kouretes and Korybantes were both groups (usually trios, groups of five, or groups of nine) of Theoi or Daimones depicted as warlike men, and They were given charge of sacred mysteries.  The Kouretes were also supposedly given the job of protecting baby Zeus from his father Kronos, and did a loud war-dance as part of Their job of being a divine distraction.  The Kouretes were originally from Crete, and the Korybantes from Samothrace, though the two groups were heavily associated with one another and confused with one another even in ancient Hellas.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the ogdóe phthínontos (roughly pronounced “ogg-DOH-ay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the eighth [until] the ending [of the month].” 
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Thank-You Thursday / 21 Pyanepsión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Got something you’re thankful for?  Today’s the day to share it!  Try one of the following:

  • Say a prayer of thanksgiving at your Home Shrine.
  • Write a thank-you note to one of your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Leave a thank-you gift at your Home Shrine.  It doesn’t need to be diamonds and Godiva Chocolate—a Jolly Rancher or a found coin might be enough!
  • Take a moment to thank someone close to you for something they did to help you.
  • Or thank them just for being there!
  • Pay your thanks forward—donate to a charity or do a random act of kindness.
  • For those inclined towards Hellenic polytheism: Pandora’s Kharis, a charity fund established by Elani Temperance of Baring the Aegis, is raising money to help with online pagan journal The Wild Hunt’s fall fundraiser (link goes to TWH’s Indiegogo fundraiser page).  If you want to take part, donate to Pandora’s Kharis by 24 October (or directly to TWH by 2 November).
  • Want to see other fundraisers organized by pagans, polytheists, or other practitioners?  Send an ask or fanmail!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 21st of the month of Pyanepsión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Hesiod’s Works and Days and the Scholia accompanying those verses suggests that the 21st is sacred to Athene, though Your Mod has been unable to find any information as to why.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 47, 48, and 49 to Sabazios, Ippa, and Lysios Lenaios.
  • For those of you unfamiliar with these Theoi, they are all associated with syncretic mysteries surrounding Dionysos.  Here’s more information about each one:
  • Sabazios is a Thracian/Phrygian god syncretized with a few different Hellenic Theoi—including Zeus, Ares, and Dionysos.  If you’d like to read more about Thracian religion and mysticism, Your Mod recommends the blog Anomalous Thracian.  Its author is a spirit-worker who follows multiple paths, one of them being Thracian initiatory traditions.
  • Ippa is a Phrygian goddess, alternately interpreted as a nurse of Dionysos or a form of the Phrygian mother-goddess Kybele, who—in some accounts—is supposed to have rescued Dionysos from Hera’s wrath by taking the infant vine-god to Kybele Herself.
  • Lysios Lenaios is an epithet of Dionysos as a wine-god who helped humans to relax and have fun (among other things).  There’s some dispute about the epithet “Lenaios,” as it has etymological ties to Greek terms for both the wine-press and the Mainades (female followers of Dionysos).  The epithet “Lysios” comes from the Greek word lyein, meaning “to loosen.”
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the enáte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “enn-AH-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the ninth [until] the ending [of the month].”  We start counting backwards to one so we can count down to the new moon.
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions? Send us an ask or fanmail!

Cleanse-Day Wednesday / 20 Pyanepsión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Shrine getting a little dusty?  Time to bust out the barley/natron/vinegar/Windex/elbow grease!  Don’t obsess—just do one of the following:

  • Detail-dust the smaller ornaments on your shrine.
  • Detail-dust the larger ornaments on your shrine.
  • Wash and dry your altar-cloths.
  • Take a damp rag (or other appropriate cleansing item) and give your icons/eidola/images a mini-bath.
  • Wipe, dust, or otherwise clean your altar base (or the piece of furniture where your altar is located).
  • Sweep, mop, or vacuum the floor around your altar space.
  • Offer some incense, sprinkle some khernips, smoke-cleanse, or otherwise purify your altar-space ritually.
  • Altar’s spotless?  Tackle a mess in another room of your living space.  Cleanliness is next to godliness!
  • Stressed out?  Emotional and psychological cleansing is important, too.  Do something to purify or detox yourself!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 20th of the month of Pyanepsión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • Hesiod’s Works and Days and the Scholia accompanying those verses suggests that the 20th is sacred to Apollon, though Your Mod has been unable to find any information as to why.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 33 and 75 to Apollon and the Mousai, in accordance with Hesiod.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the months is called the eikás or eikosté (roughly pronounced “ey-KAHSS” or “ey-koss-TAY”), meaning “the twentieth.”  (That’s surprisingly straightforward for the Hellenic calendar.)
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Tasty Tuesday / 19 Pyanepsión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Time for some noms!  Try something along these lines:

  • Offer some food your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities would like on your Home Shrine.
  • Offer some food YOU like on your Home Shrine.
  • Same as the above, but with drinks.
  • Make something to eat and dedicate the time/effort to your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Make something to eat and give it away to loved ones, or to people who need the food.
  • Donate to a local Food Bank.
  • Practice some Kitchen Witchery.
  • Submit a recipe to Ritual Recipes!  (Or find something there that you’d like to make!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 19th of the month of Pyanepsión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 19th is not otherwise traditionally associated with any Theos in the Athenian calendar, though the scattered ancient commentary (collectively called Scholia) on Hesiod’s Works and Days suggests that the 18th and 19th of the month are good for purifying and warding oneself and one’s space.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 1164, and 37 to Herakles, Ares, and the Kouretes.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the enáte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “enn-AH-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the ninth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Music Monday / 18 Pyanepsión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take five and play some music at your home shrine.  Try doing one (or more than one, or all) of the following:

  • Put a favorite song on the radio and play it at your Home Shrine.  Don’t forget to invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to accept the offering (or even join in)!
  • Dance to the music.
  • Sing something.
  • Play a musical instrument?  Play a song or solo!
  • Dedicate some music practice to one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.

Spread the devotion (and, more importantly, the good music) by reblogging this post with your song of choice!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 18th of the month of Pyanepsión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 18th is not traditionally associated with any Theos in the Athenian calendar, though the scattered ancient commentary (collectively called Scholia) on Hesiod’s Works and Days suggests that the 18th and 19th of the month are good for purifying oneself and one’s space.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 1518, and 65 to Hera, Zeus, and Hephaistos.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the ogdóe mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “ogg-DOE-ay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the eighth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Anonymous said: in the roundup you just posted, you said "beginning today, 1 June" for Roman Catholicism

WHOOPS.  On that.

Edit: Fixed.  Your Mod has apparently been making that mistake for QUITE a while.  Thanks for the sharp eyes!

HHH Weekly Roundup: October 12-18 2014


This Week’s Hellenic Calendar Reminders:

  • No major points of note for this week (at least in the Athenian/Attic calendar followed by Hellenion).

Festivals in Other Traditions:

  • Judaism: The seven (or eight) day long festival of Sukkot, which commemorates (among other things) the nomadic life of the Jews after their exodus from Egypt, ends on Wednesday, 15 October, with the festival of Hoshanah Rabbah (the day that G-d’s judgment for the year is delivered). // The evening of Thursday, 16 October, marks the start of the eighth day of Sukkot (for Jews living outside of Israel) as well as the holy day Shemini Atzeret; this festival is a day for the Jewish people to stay a day longer with G-d and celebrate their relationship with Him.  Shemini Atzeret ends at sundown on Friday, 17 October.
  • Roman Catholicism: Saints’ festivals this week, beginning today, are: Sunday—Blessed Francis Xavier Seelos; Monday—Blessed Marie-Rose Durocher; Tuesday—St. Callistus I; Wednesday—St. Teresa of Avila; Thursday—St. Margaret Mary Alacoque; Friday—St. Ignatius of Antioch; Saturday—St. Luke.
  • Eastern Orthodox Christianity: Here are the commemmorations for SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday; and Saturday.
  • Heathenry/Asatru: Some Asatru sects celebrate a day of remembrance for Leif Ericsson on Monday, 13 October.
  • Religio Romana: Today, 12 October, marks a holy day and offering to Divus Augustus (the deified Augustus, first Emperor of Rome). // Monday, 13 October, is a holy day of offering and thanksgiving to Fontus, the God of springs and places where water flows out of the earth. // Wednesday, 15 October (Ides Octobris) marked the October Horse sacrifice to Mars (a group of horses would be raced, with the winning horse becoming the sacrifice) as well as a day of offering to Iuppiter.
  • Shinto: Around the middle of this week (Tuesday and Wednesday), the Matsubara Hachiman Shrine in Himeji City (Japan’s Hyogo Prefecture) will celebrate the Nada no Kenka Matsuri, or “Fighting Festival,” in which three groups of men carry portable shrines on their shoulders and try to get their shrine on top of the others. // Friday, 17 October, marks the Shuki Tasai Grand Autumn Festival, in which a portable shrine leads a procession of 800 people dressed in clothing and equipment authentic to Japan’s 17th century for a kilometer from the Futarasan-jinja Shrine in Sannai.
  • Ekklesia Antinoou: Today, 12 October, is the day on which Matthew Shepard was murdered.

Article Highlights:

See anything this past week in the pagan or polytheist spheres of Tumblr that made you cheer?  Any posts that made you proud to be on the path you follow?  Any people or bloggers that you feel others should read?  Or do you know of a festival or event coming up that you would like to share?  Send them in!

This weekly round-up post may end up catering primarily to Hellenic Polytheists, but any pagan faith can submit recommendations if they want to.  Posts, events, and other items will be posted at Your Mod’s discretion.

Self-Care Sunday / 17 Pyanepsión 2.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Even the most devoted of devotees gets burned out once in a while.  Take a day to rest, relax, and recharge!

  • Do something for yourself.  Even if it means adding five minutes to your short shower, do something to remind yourself that you matter!  Even if your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities are distant or aloof, you always matter to your Home.  YOU ARE IMPORTANT.  Never forget that.
  • Meditate.  Or try to!
  • Do some work around your living space.
  • Spend time with family, friends, or other loved ones.
  • Do something important that matters to YOU, even (especially?) if it’s not related to your religious or spiritual life.
  • Find a book, article, or something else about your religion/spirituality.  Read it (or at least part of it).  Take notes.  Maybe you can post your notes to a blog for others to see!
  • Or do the same with a book about something YOU like that’s not related to your religion or spirituality!

Remember, Devotees: the point we’re making is that you CAN take five minutes out of your day and do something to remind yourself and your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities that you’re thinking of Them!  Take five minutes and remind yourself of your Home.

Don’t obsess!  Just be at home.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 17th of the month of Pyanepsión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are in the second year of the 698th Olympiad.
  • The 17th is not traditionally associated with any Theos in the Athenian calendar, though Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions involve reading Orphic Hymns 44, 45, and 46 to Dionysos.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hebdóme mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “heb-DOH-may meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the seventh of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!