Thank-You Thursday / 24 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Got something you’re thankful for?  Today’s the day to share it!  Try one of the following:

  • Say a prayer of thanksgiving at your Home Shrine.
  • Write a thank-you note to one of your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Leave a thank-you gift at your Home Shrine.  It doesn’t need to be diamonds and Godiva Chocolate—a Jolly Rancher or a found coin might be enough!
  • Take a moment to thank someone close to you for something they did to help you.
  • Or thank them just for being there!
  • Pay your thanks forward—donate to a charity or do a random act of kindness.
  • For those inclined towards Hellenic polytheism: Pandora’s Kharis, a charity fund established by Elani Temperance of Baring the Aegis, is raising money during this lunar month for the International Mental Health Research Organizaton.  100% of the money donated to this group is used to fund research, so check out this link and donate if you’re so inclined!
  • Want Your Mod to include other fundraisers organized by pagans, polytheists, or other practitioners?  Send an ask or fanmail!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 24th of the month of Mounykhión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • The 24th of the lunar month is not traditionally associated with any Theoi.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 51, 52, and 53 to Dionysos as originator of and reason for festivals.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hebdóme phthínontos (roughly pronounced “heb-DOH-may f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the seventh [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Cleanse-Day Wednesday / 23 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Shrine getting a little dusty?  Time to bust out the barley/natron/vinegar/Windex/elbow grease!  Don’t obsess—just do one of the following:

  • Detail-dust the smaller ornaments on your shrine.
  • Detail-dust the larger ornaments on your shrine.
  • Wash and dry your altar-cloths.
  • Take a damp rag (or other appropriate cleansing item) and give your icons/eidola/images a mini-bath.
  • Wipe, dust, or otherwise clean your altar base (or the piece of furniture where your altar is located).
  • Sweep, mop, or vacuum the floor around your altar space.
  • Offer some incense, sprinkle some khernips, smoke-cleanse, or otherwise purify your altar-space ritually.
  • Altar’s spotless?  Tackle a mess in another room of your living space.  Cleanliness is next to godliness!
  • Stressed out?  Emotional and psychological cleansing is important, too.  Do something to purify or detox yourself!

We’d love to see you all reblog with pictures of your shiny altars!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 23rd of the month of Mounykhión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • The 23rd of the lunar month is sacred to Athene.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 31 and 32 to Athene and Nike.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the ogdóe phthínontos (roughly pronounced “heb-DOH-may f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the eighth [until] the ending [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Tasty Tuesday / 22 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Time for some noms!  Try something along these lines:

  • Offer some food your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities would like on your Home Shrine.
  • Offer some food YOU like on your Home Shrine.
  • Same as the above, but with drinks.
  • Make something to eat and dedicate the time/effort to your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Make something to eat and give it away to loved ones, or to people who need the food.
  • Donate to a local Food Bank.
  • Practice some Kitchen Witchery.
  • Submit a recipe to Ritual Recipes!  (Or find something there that you’d like to make!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 22nd of the month of Mounykhión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • Hellenismo suggests that the 22nd is sacred to Athene, though You Mod has not found any sources to corroborate this.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 30 to the Kouretes and 38 to Korybas (a member of the Korybantes).
  • The Kouretes and Korybantes were both groups (usually trios, groups of five, or groups of nine) of Theoi or Daimones depicted as warlike men, and They were given charge of sacred mysteries.  The Kouretes were also supposedly given the job of protecting baby Zeus from his father Kronos, and did a loud war-dance as part of Their job of being a divine distraction.  The Kouretes were originally from Crete, and the Korybantes from Samothrace, though the two groups were heavily associated with one another and confused with one another even in ancient Hellas.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the enáte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “enn-AH-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the ninth [until] the ending [of the month].” 
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.  (Wondering why we’re counting down instead of up now?  The last decade counts the days backwards!)
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Music Monday / 21 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take five and play some music at your home shrine.  Try doing one (or more than one, or all) of the following:

  • Put a favorite song on the radio and play it at your Home Shrine.  Don’t forget to invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to accept the offering (or even join in)!
  • Dance to the music.
  • Sing something.
  • Play a musical instrument?  Play a song or solo!
  • Dedicate some music practice to one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.

Spread the devotion (and, more importantly, the good music) by reblogging this post with your song of choice!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 21st of the month of Mounykhión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • Hesiod’s Works and Days and the Scholia accompanying those verses suggests that the 21st is sacred to Athene, though Your Mod has been unable to find any information as to why—if you can send in further info, it would be greatly appreciated!
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 47, 48, and 49 to Sabazios, Ippa, and Lysios Lenaios.
  • For those of you unfamiliar with these Theoi, they are all associated with syncretic mysteries surrounding Dionysos.  Here’s more information about each one:
  • Sabazios is a Thracian/Phrygian god syncretized with a few different Hellenic Theoi—including Zeus, Ares, and Dionysos.  If you’d like to read more about Thracian religion and mysticism, Your Mod recommends the blog Anomalous Thracian.  Its author is a spirit-worker who follows multiple paths, one of them being Thracian initiatory traditions.
  • Ippa is a Phrygian goddess, alternately interpreted as a nurse of Dionysos or a form of the Phrygian mother-goddess Kybele, who—in some accounts—is supposed to have rescued Dionysos from Hera’s wrath by taking the infant vine-god to Kybele Herself.
  • Lysios Lenaios is an epithet of Dionysos as a wine-god who helped humans to relax and have fun (among other things).  There’s some dispute about the epithet “Lenaios,” as it has etymological ties to Greek terms for both the wine-press and the Mainades (female followers of Dionysos).  The epithet “Lysios” comes from the Greek word lyein, meaning “to loosen.”
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the dekáte phthínontos (roughly pronounced “deck-AH-tay f-THEE-non-toss”), meaning “the tenth [until] the ending [of the month].”  We start at ten instead of one so we can count down to the new moon.
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.  This last decade of the lunar month is a good time to wrap up projects.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have any corrections or suggestions?  Send us an ask or a fanmail!

Anonymous asked: Excuse the random question but...how come you don't have an avatar?

Never chose one.  Your Mod tends to be pretty random with avatar choices and has yet to find a decent one for a Hestia e-shrine.

Weekly Round-Up


Welcome to a new type of post here on Home, Hearth, and Heart!

Once a week, Your Mod will endeavor to bring you a list of calendar events in the upcoming week; posts of exceptional quality made in the past week (exceptional because of how informative or inspirational they are); and highlights of positive events in the past week.

So here is the call: See anything this past week in the pagan or polytheist spheres of Tumblr that made you cheer?  Any posts that made you proud to follow the path you follow?  And people or bloggers that you feel others should read?  Or do you know of a festival or event coming up that you would like to share?  Send them in!

(Your Mod will also be searching for these, but would feel MUCH more comfortable having multiple contributors!)

This weekly round-up post may end up catering primarily to Hellenic Polytheists, but any pagan faith can submit recommendations if they so choose.  Posts, events, and other items will be posted at Your Mod’s discretion.

This Week’s Round-Up:

  • While there are no specific events in the Attic (Hellenic) religious calendar coming up this week, we are into the last decade of the lunar month.  Now is a good time to wrap up projects or to focus on what you would like to see decrease in your life.
  • We wish a very happy Easter/Pascha to our Christian friends!  This is the first time in several years that Western and Eastern Easters have occurred on the same Sunday, which is pretty neat!
  • We also wish a happy Passover to our Jewish friends!
  • Friendly reminder: Easter is a Christian holiday.  Its roots are in the Jewish holiday of Passover, from which it also derives its timing.  While there may be some syncretism in symbols, it is not the same as any other pagan holiday—including Ostara (which is a Spring Equinox festival that occurred about a month ago)!
  • We also thank our Christian bloggers (and their friends in the Satanic and Luciferian communities) for working so hard to correct this misinformation.  You all are awesome, and we’re sure your God is happy to count you as His followers!
  • Blog Highlight: If you worship the Hellenic Theoi, Your Mod HIGHLY encourages you to check out Baring the Aegis.  Elani Temperance, a Blogspot blogger, Hellenic Polytheist, and member of the reconstructionist group Elaión, has recently started a tumblr that is an invaluable source of information.  She also works hard to give Hellenic polytheism a good public name, in party by leading the charity cause Pandora’s Kharis.  Knowledgeable and willing to help newbies out, this blog (as well as her Blogspot blog) should definitely be on your to-read list, even if you don’t consider yourself a recon.

(Your Mod knows several other WONDERFUL Hellenic polytheism blogs, let alone other pagan/polytheist blogs, that she could mention, but is starting small for now.)

Self-Care Sunday / 20 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Even the most devoted of devotees gets burned out once in a while.  Take a day to rest, relax, and recharge!

  • Do something for yourself.  Even if it means adding five minutes to your short shower, do something to remind yourself that you matter!  Even if your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities are distant or aloof, you always matter to your Home.  YOU ARE IMPORTANT.  Never forget that.
  • Meditate.  Or try to!
  • Do some work around your living space.
  • Spend time with family, friends, or other loved ones.
  • Do something important that matters to YOU, even (especially?) if it’s not related to your religious or spiritual life.
  • Find a book, article, or something else about your religion/spirituality.  Read it (or at least part of it).  Take notes.  Maybe you can post your notes to a blog for others to see!
  • Or do the same with a book about something YOU like that’s not related to your religion or spirituality!

Remember, Devotees: the point we’re making is that you CAN take five minutes out of your day and do something to remind yourself and your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities that you’re thinking of Them!  Take five minutes and remind yourself of your Home.

Don’t obsess!  Just be at home.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 20th of the month of Mounykhión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • Hesiod’s Works and Days and the Scholia accompanying those verses suggests that the 20th is sacred to Apollon, though Your Mod has been unable to find any information as to why.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 33 and 75 to Apollon and the Mousai, in accordance with Hesiod.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the months is called the eikás or eikosté (roughly pronounced “ey-KAHSS” or “ey-koss-TAY”), meaning “the twentieth.”  (That’s surprisingly straightforward for the Hellenic calendar.)
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Anonymous asked: I'm having a lot of problems with my faith. I believe in the Gods, there is no doubt about that but I feel so alone in it. All around me I see Christians, Jews, Muslims that have communities, people they can talk to, and above all: love. I don't know if I am loved by my Gods I don't know if I love my Gods. I feel as though it is all worship and though they watch over me, it feels like all business. I feel so lost in my faith and don't know what to do. I just need advice

<Your Mod takes off formal “Your-Mod” hat.>

This is difficult.  It’s extra-difficult because I’VE BEEN THERE.  I’ve been where you are.  Poetically, it’s called a “fallow time,” and everyone of every faith experiences it—that feeling of going through the motions without any real sense of connection.  It’s one of the reasons I waffled between Hellenic Polytheism and Christianity for about a decade.

It can feel like the Theoi are there, but distant; the relationship between Them and their devotees can be very different than that between the Abrahamic God and His.  When you’re at that stage, you know you love the Theoi, and you know that They’re present—that They exist—but you just don’t feel that connection.  Sometimes you wonder if you’ll ever feel it again without leaving the Theoi you love.  Sometimes you wonder if you’ll ever be happy with any religious path.

The only thing I can tell you is: hold on.  Keep pushing through.  The Theoi like testing devotees to see if they’ll be able to handle this path.  Sometimes, one Theos will bring you into the Hellenic Polytheism fold, only to seemingly abandon you, leaving you feeling alone.  That’s what happened with me and Hermes.  (For the record—just because you FEEL alone doesn’t mean you are.  I know that doesn’t help you now, but the Theoi are always there—like I said, it can be a test.)

But there’s a story about one young lady who felt abandoned by the person she felt she could trust the most—abandoned, without any chance of going back to the life she once had OR of going on with the life she’d chosen for herself.  Her name was Ariadne, and she was rescued by another Theos, one whom She did not expect.  That was Dionysos.

Not only did Dionysos rescue Her, she became His bride—and eventually, a Theos in Her own right.

Sometimes we need to experience the pain of being lost before we can truly know the joy of being found.  It sounds hokey, and doubly so since it’s a running theme of other faiths like Christianity, but you’re NOT the only one who has ever felt that way.

Keep praying.  Keep honoring the Theoi, if They are the gods you’ve decided to follow.  Keep reading and researching.  You will find one of Them.  Or maybe one of Them will find you.  I’m reminded of lyrics to one of my favorite songs, “Lovers in a Dangerous Time”:

Nothing worth having comes without some kind of fight

Gotta kick at the darkness ‘til it bleeds daylight

And if you ever need or want someone to talk to, you have us HPs on tumblr, and elsewhere.  Ping me if you wanna chat, here or on my personal Hellenic polytheism blog.

Setup Saturday / 19 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Take a good look at your Home Shrine.  Is it everything you want it to be?  If not, try one of the following:

  • Remove an object that you think no longer belongs on your Home Shrine.  Is it still important to you, or have your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities asked you to keep it?  Put it somewhere else in your living space—so long as it feels like it belongs there!
  • Have something you’ve been meaning to cleanse/purify and add to your altar space?  Today’s the day!
  • Dreaming of the perfect altar?  Put together a Home Shrine Wishlist.  You don’t need to go out and buy everything—but it’s helpful to get an idea of what you want on your altar eventually!
  • Got your Wishlist put together?  Got money?  Go get one of the items on your Wishlist!
  • Something about your Home Shrine setup bugging you, but you can’t put your finger on it?  Try rearranging things and see if you like it better.  (You can always go change it back!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 19th of the month of Mounykhión.
  • Today marks the celebration of the Olympeia, an Athenian festival to Zeus Olympios (His aspect as ruler of Olympos).  The story goes that, after the Theoi won their war against the Titans, Zeus and His brothers Poseidon and Haides cast lots to see who would control the heavens and earth, the sea, and the Underworld.  They agreed beforehand to be content with any result.  Haides won control of the Underworld, Poseidon the oceans, and Zeus the heavens and earth.  Zeus did not HAVE to do this—He was the leader of the Theoi already and could have declared Himself ruler of the heavens and earth.  He chose to give his brothers a fair chance.
  • In ancient Athens, it was traditional to offer lavish sacrifices to Zeus.  Today, a libation of something to drink will do just fine.  See if you can offer Him some food, as well, or find someone who will listen to a story about Him.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • The 19th is not traditionally associated with any Theos in the Athenian calendar, though the scattered ancient commentary (collectively called Scholia) on Hesiod’s Works and Days suggests that the 18th and 19th of the month are good for purifying and warding oneself and one’s space.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 1164, and 37 to Herakles, Ares, and the Kouretes.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the enáte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “enn-AH-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the ninth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have any suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Fun and Fancy Friday / 18 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Today is a day to do something crazy, creative, or otherwise just plain old fun at your  Home Shrine!

  • Today’s Challenge: Invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to a tea-party.  Tiny crustless sandwiches optional.

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 18th of the month of Mounykhión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • The 18th is not traditionally associated with any Theos in the Athenian calendar, though the scattered ancient commentary (collectively called Scholia) on Hesiod’s Works and Days suggests that the 18th and 19th of the month are good for purifying oneself and one’s space.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggest reading Orphic Hymns 1518, and 65 to Hera, Zeus, and Hephaistos.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the ogdóe mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “ogg-DOE-ay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the eighth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Dusk tonight marks the beginning of the Olympeia, an Athenian holiday celebrating Zeus as ruler of Olympos.  Most of us can’t afford to sacrifice any bulls to the Thunderer, but you can offer Him libations and tell stories about Him!
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Thank-You Thursday / 17 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Got something you’re thankful for?  Today’s the day to share it!  Try one of the following:

  • Say a prayer of thanksgiving at your Home Shrine.
  • Write a thank-you note to one of your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Leave a thank-you gift at your Home Shrine.  It doesn’t need to be diamonds and Godiva Chocolate—a Jolly Rancher or a found coin might be enough!
  • Take a moment to thank someone close to you for something they did to help you.
  • Or thank them just for being there!
  • Pay your thanks forward—donate to a charity or do a random act of kindness.
  • For those inclined towards Hellenic polytheism: Pandora’s Kharis, a charity fund established by Elani Temperance of Baring the Aegis, raised $120 to donate to the National Runaway Safeline.  Thank you if you donated!  They are currently taking votes on this month’s charities, so if you are a member of their Facebook page, go vote.
  • Want Your Mod to include other fundraisers organized by pagans, polytheists, or other practitioners?  Send an ask!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 17th of the month of Mounykhión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • The 17th is not traditionally associated with any Theos in the Athenian calendar, though Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions involve reading Orphic Hymns 44, 45, and 46 to Dionysos.
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hebdóme mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “heb-DOH-may meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the seventh of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Cleanse-Day Wednesday / 16 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Shrine getting a little dusty?  Time to bust out the barley/natron/vinegar/Windex/elbow grease!  Don’t obsess—just do one of the following:

  • Detail-dust the smaller ornaments on your shrine.
  • Detail-dust the larger ornaments on your shrine.
  • Wash and dry your altar-cloths.
  • Take a damp rag (or other appropriate cleansing item) and give your icons/eidola/images a mini-bath.
  • Wipe, dust, or otherwise clean your altar base (or the piece of furniture where your altar is located).
  • Sweep, mop, or vacuum the floor around your altar space.
  • Offer some incense, sprinkle some khernips, smoke-cleanse, or otherwise purify your altar-space ritually.
  • Altar’s spotless?  Tackle a mess in another room of your living space.  Cleanliness is next to godliness!
  • Stressed out?  Emotional and psychological cleansing is important, too.  Do something to purify or detox yourself!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 16th of the month of Mounykhión.
  • Today is the Mounykhia, a celebration of Artemis as Phoibe (Light-Bringer, the aspect of Artemis associated with moonlight) and Potnia Theron (Mistress of Beasts, the aspect of Artemis associated with wild animals).
  • In ancient Athens, the Mounykhia commemorated the time that Artemis became angry with the city’s residents for killing a bear that had entered Her sacred temple.  In myths, Artemis values animal life on the same level as human life, so She demanded a daughter of the Athenians be sacrificed to make up for this injustice.  One Athenian made a compromise with Artemis: he brought his daughter to be sacrificed, but at the last minute, substituted a goat dressed in his daughter’s clothing.
  • It was traditional both to repeat the goat sacrifice and to offer Artemis cakes with circles of candles stuck in them.  If you want to offer to Her, get some cupcakes and candles!  Animal crackers make good offerings, too.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • The 16th of the lunar month is not traditionally associated with any particular Theoi, though Erkhia’s calendar associated it with sacrifices to Semele and Dionysos.  Drew Campbell associates it with Artemis.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 35 to Artemis, 1 to Prothyraia (a Theos associated with childbirth), 34 to Leto (the Mother of Artemis and Apollon), and 71 to Tykhe (the Theos associated with the ups and downs of fortune).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the hékte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “HECK-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the sixth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • If you are looking for a good e-shrine to Artemis, try Tales of Transformation right here!
  • Know any other good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fanmail!

Anonymous asked: Did you do anything special for the eclipse? :)

Not particularly—it was the Full Moon, so in Hellenic polytheism, it was a night to offer to Selene.  You Mod didn’t do anything different than she would for a normal Full Moon, though.

Tasty Tuesday / 15 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!

Time for some noms!  Try something along these lines:

  • Offer some food your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities would like on your Home Shrine.
  • Offer some food YOU like on your Home Shrine.
  • Same as the above, but with drinks.
  • Make something to eat and dedicate the time/effort to your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities.
  • Make something to eat and give it away to loved ones, or to people who need the food.
  • Donate to a local Food Bank.
  • Practice some Kitchen Witchery.
  • Submit a recipe to Ritual Recipes!  (Or find something there that you’d like to make!)

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 15th of the month of Mounykhión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • The 15th of the lunar month, like the 5th and 25th, is considered a holy and even inauspicious day.  It is sacred to Athene in the Athenian calendar, and to Horkos (the personification of Oath) in Drew Campbell’s notes.
  • It’s also the day of the Full Moon, a holy time of the month sacred to Selene.
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 58 to the Moirai (Fates); 62 and 63 to Dikaionsyne (Fairness) and Nomos (Law); and 68 and 69 to the Erinyes/Eumenides (the Furies).
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the pémpte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “PEMP-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the fifth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Check out this tumblr e-shrine to Selene!
  • Sundown tonight marks the beginning of the Mounykhia, a festival to Artemis as both Light-bringer and Mistress of Animals.  In ancient Hellas, She’d receive a sacrifice of a goat dressed as a girl; it was also traditional to set up rings of torches and offer cakes.  Today, a cookie or cupcake with candles on top would be completely appropriate.
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!

Music Monday / 14 Mounykhión 1.698


Welcome, Devotees!  Full Moon Tonight!

Take five and play some music at your home shrine.  Try doing one (or more than one, or all) of the following:

  • Put a favorite song on the radio and play it at your Home Shrine.  Don’t forget to invite your Gods/Spirits/Thoughtforms/Entities to accept the offering (or even join in)!
  • Dance to the music.
  • Sing something.
  • Play a musical instrument?  Play a song or solo!
  • Dedicate some music practice to one of your Gods/Entities/Thoughtforms/Spirits.

Spread the devotion (and, more importantly, the good music) by reblogging this post with your song of choice!

Today in the Hellenic Calendar: 

  • According to the Attic calendar, it’s the 14th of the month of Mounykhión.
  • The Hellenic Calendar is made up of four-year cycles based on when the Olympics were held in ancient Olympia.  We are now in the first year of a new Olympiad—the 698th since the four-year cycle began!
  • Drew Campbell’s list of daily devotions suggests reading Orphic Hymns 12 and 13 to Kronos and Rhea, the Titan Father and Mother of Zeus and His siblings, as well as Hymn 36 to all the Titans in general.  (Remember, though some Titans are big meanies in the myths, They also control / are associated with natural forces that are necessary to the balance of the Earth and universe.)
  • NOTE: Regarding the Orphic Hymns, the public-domain Thomas Taylor translation combines the first two prayers (#0, “To Musaeus,” and #1, “To Hecate”) into one ginormous prayer.  The Apostolos Athanassakis translation keeps the two separate.  Theoi.com uses Taylor’s Translation (again, because it’s public domain), but Drew Campbell drew from Athanassakis.  So if, say, Campbell suggests using Hymn 34 (“To Apollo”), Your Mod will follow Taylor’s numbering system and link to Hymn 33 on Theoi.com.  The more you know~
  • For those of you who would like to learn ancient Greek, this day of the month is called the tetárte mesoûntos (roughly pronounced “tet-ARR-tay meh-SOON-toss”), meaning “the fourth of the middle [of the month].”
  • The ancient Hellens divided their lunar month into three sets of 10 days (or two of 10 and one of 9), called “decades,” rather than a number of 7-day weeks.
  • Know any good e-shrines?  Have suggestions or corrections?  Send us an ask or fan-mail!